Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Kernel Log: progress with free graphics drivers, three new stable kernels

Filed under

A new version of the nv driver supports later NVIDIA GPUs. Drivers giving 3D support for later Radeon GPUs are making progress, and so is code for running the X server without root rights. The kernel developers have now issued new stable kernel versions and no longer support the 2.6.29 series.

Not much has been heard in recent months about the open-source graphics driver for NVIDIA GPUs, properly known as "xf86-video-nv" but usually shortened to just "nv". Recently, however, NVIDIA man Aaron Plattner released version 2.1.14. Although innovations are few, some of the changes mean that the driver now handles a great many later graphic chips that were previously only supported by the Nouveau driver or the proprietary NVIDIA driver. These include various GeForce 7950 cards, the GeForce models 285 and 295, and many other graphics cards in the 9000 series.

Kernel status

At the end of last week, the minders of the Linux Stable Series released versions, and, as usual advising users of previous versions to update, but without stating explicitly whether these new versions eliminate security bugs.
The updated kernels in the 27 and 29 series differ from their predecessors with 30 to 40 patches. Greg Kroah-Hartman emphasises in his email on that this is to be the last version in the 29 series. In the 2.6.30-stable review email, he apologises for the late appearance of the first stable version for Linux version 2.6.30, which was released four weeks ago. With more than a hundred changes, is quite comprehensive.

rest here

More in Tux Machines

Fresh Benchmarks Of CentOS 7 On Xeon & EPYC With/Without KPTI/Retpolines

While every few weeks or so we have ended up running benchmarks of the latest Linux Git kernel to see the evolving performance impact of KPTI (Kernel Page Table Isolation) and Retpolines for Meltdown and Spectre V2 mitigation, respectively, a request came in last week from a premium supporter to see some new comparison test runs on CentOS 7 with its older 3.10-evolved kernel. Read more

Reviewing logins on Linux

The last command provides an easy way to review recent logins on a Linux system. It also has some useful options –- such as looking for logins for one particular user or looking for logins in an older wtmp file. The last command with no arguments will easily show you all recent logins. It pulls the information from the current wtmp (/var/log/wtmp) file and shows the logins in reverse sequential order (newest first). Read more

Today in Techrights

Feed the dog and close the door with an open source home automation system

As voice assistants, smart bulbs, and other devices increasingly become household staples, more people than ever are bringing smart technology into their homes. But the bewildering assortment of products on the market can present challenges: Remembering which app to use and trying to link things together with automation can get complicated quickly. In this article, I’ll show you a few ways I used an open source home automation platform, Home Assistant, to bring all my devices together. Read more