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One Linux to rule them all

There is a whole lot of noise being made about Googles OS announcement.

Most of it being made by raving distro fanboys who believe that by pledging their allegiance to one distro will make part of the 'cool crowd'

"No thanks Google, we have Ubuntu/Debian/Gentoo/pick one"

At the same time, everyone is crying that it is an example of Linux becoming 'more fragmented'. Just one more of the too many distros available.

First of all, what the raving fanboys and the fragmented wailers are forgetting is that Linux supersedes all of these things.

Linux is not an OS of only one image. It is not an OS to be dictated by one company or person.

To spell it out, GNU/Linux is not just 'an' OS, it's 'my' OS. it's 'your' OS. It's a promise of sorts that says this OS is here to work the way you want it to work, not the way someone else wants it to work.

The number of versions of GNU/Linux out there shouldn't be seen as an 'over-proliferation' or as fragmentation of the whole thing either. They are 'presentations' of just what can be done by many different people with one 'open' OS.

The beauty of GNU/Linux is that so many versions of it can be presented for so many different usage environments. If anything, what GNU/Linux needs is to better clarify what those examples are and provide better directions to 'types' of existing presentations of Linux for different types of users.

For example, If you are looking for examples of 'Home Desktops' in GNU/Linux, look at these on the left (see the pretend list of Home desktop distros compiled there), on the right, there are the Business Workstation presentations (see similar pretend compiled list).

On top, is our list of 'generic' Linux distros from which you can customize yourself split into 'binary' and 'source-based' versions (see pretend list of distros like Debian, CentOS, fedora, OpenSuse, Gentoo, Arch, LFS and so on...)

Googles advance into the Linux-based distro is just another example of how Linux can be modified for a specific, targeted market. I firmly believe it will be designed to support web based applications and usage and therefore is another exciting example of GNU/Linux displaying it's flexibility.

It's all good. Relax

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