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Red Hat profit rises, bucks tech industry trend

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Canonical/Ubuntu: Snap Store, Center for Internet Security (CIS) and MAAS

  • An adventure through the Snap Store

    An application store with a large number of entries is a double-edged sword. It’s often a good sign of a vibrant, thriving community of software creators, developers and users working together. But then, people new to the ecosystem may struggle finding relevant content right away. The Snap Store currently offers about 7,000 applications, so exploration and discovery can take quite a bit of time and effort. We’d like to help you find useful, interesting applications by taking you on a little tour through the Snap Store.

  • CIS hardened Ubuntu: cyber attack and malware prevention for mission-critical systems

    The Center for Internet Security (CIS) is a nonprofit organisation that uses a community-driven process to release benchmarks to safeguard enterprises against cyber attacks. It is one of the most recognised industry standards that provides comprehensive configuration checklists to identify and remediate security vulnerabilities in a computing environment. CIS benchmark has hundreds of configuration recommendations, so hardening a system manually can be very tedious. For large deployments and clouds that may not be practically viable. To drastically improve this process for enterprises, Canonical has made CIS automation tooling available to its Ubuntu Advantage for Infrastructure customers. The compliance tooling has two objectives: it lets our customers harden their Ubuntu systems effortlessly and then quickly audit those systems against the published CIS Ubuntu benchmarks. The SCAP content for audit tooling that scans the system for compliance is CIS certified.

  • Questioning the doc

    Here’s a VLOG about some changes we’re making to the MAAS documentation. It’s all about using questions at the top of articles to help direct attention. This idea grew out of our frustration over long pages with lots of complex information. We tried a top table of contents, but that looks weird and requires a lot of policing to keep up-to-date.

Linux and Linux Foundation: Intel Media Linux Driver, LF Edge and Fintech Open Source Foundation

  • Intel Media Linux Driver Q1-2020 Released With Tiger Lake Features, Better VP9 Encode

    Intel's open-source multimedia crew has released their Media Driver Q1'2020 build for Linux users. This Intel Media driver is what provides Video Acceleration API (VA-API) capabilities for Intel GPU-based video encode/decode for Broadwell through next-gen Tiger Lake. The Intel Media Driver Q1-2020 release has continued its bring-up of Tiger Lake. New features for Tiger Lake that are now exposed on the video front are HEVC SCC (Screen Content Coding) decode, better robustness, enhanced tile mode support, and other changes.

  • Linux Foundation, LF Networking, and LF Edge Announce Rescheduled Dates and Full Agenda for Open Networking & Edge Summit North America 2020

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, along with co-hosts LF Networking, the umbrella organization fostering collaboration and innovation across the entire open networking stack, and LF Edge, the umbrella organization building an open source framework for the edge, announced today the rescheduled event dates for Open Networking & Edge Summit North America (ONES, formerly Open Networking Summit) and the complete session line-up. ONES North America 2020 will take place September 28-30 at the JW Marriott LA Live in Los Angeles, California. The summit line-up features prominent speakers from AT&T, eBay, Ericsson, Huawei Technologies, Rancher Labs, Red Hat, Toyota Motor Corporation, Verizon, VMware, Wells Fargo, Yelp, and more. The full event agenda is available here.

  • 'State of the Edge,' the Project to Define Edge Computing, Now Part of Linux Foundation

    LF Edge, the edge-focused project that the Linux Foundation started early last year, is growing. On Wednesday, State of the Edge, an open project to define, explain, and quantify an edge computing ecosystem, officially became part of LF Edge. The Open Glossary of Edge Computing, which had been a stand-alone project within LF Edge, is getting rolled into State of the Edge.

  • Fintech Open Source Foundation Joins Linux Foundation to Expand and Accelerate Development Across Financial Services

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open collaboration, and the Fintech Open Source Foundation (FINOS), a nonprofit whose mission is to accelerate adoption of open source software, standards and best practices in financial services, today announced that FINOS will become a Linux Foundation organization. To enable this effort, the Linux Foundation has agreed to acquire the FINOS operating assets. The Linux Foundation will position FINOS as its umbrella project through which to advance further development of open source and standards within the financial services industry. The FINOS team, led by Executive Director Gabriele Columbro, will join the Linux Foundation. Columbro will continue in his role.

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora

  • IBM and CGI U partner on the 2020 Call for Code Global Challenge University Edition to take on COVID-19 and climate change

    Since Call for Code was announced two years ago by Founding Partner IBM, Creator David Clark Cause, and Charitable Partner United Nations Human Rights, we learned two important points in the process of tackling some of society’s biggest challenges: 1) We can’t do this alone, and 2) the most promising innovations often come from unexpected sources. The scope and urgency of the issues we’re facing demand diverse perspectives and expertise, and student participation is key to that. We are honored to partner with the Clinton Global Initiative University (CGI U) for the second year and to launch a dedicated University Edition within Call for Code. Last year, we saw students reach the final rounds of the Call for Code Global Challenge with some exciting solutions. Two of our top five teams came from universities: Team AsTeR from UC Berkeley and Rove from UCLA. Together, IBM and CGI U reached more than 10,000 students around the world. This year, we wanted to do more to encourage students to participate in Call for Code as we tackle the world’s reaction to COVID-19 and climate change. In a “Digital Innovation” class at San Jose State University in which IBMers are mentors, students are earning course credits for building IBM Watson-powered apps to help fight COVID-19 and for participating in the Call for Code University Edition. We’re especially thankful to Professor Yu Chen for partnering with us and supporting students’ desire to help in this time of need, while learning skills that will benefit them and society. We’d love other faculty and universities to join the effort by participating in Call for Code and integrating COVID-19 and climate change projects into coursework.

  • Rex 1.9.0 available in Fedora updates-testing repositories

    Version 1.9.0 of the friendly automation framework named Rex is now available in Fedoras updates-testing repositories. If you're into DevOps and automation and need some alternatives to Ansible, Puppet or Salt, this one probably is for you.

  • Python 3.9 alpha in Fedora

    The Python developers have already released five alpha versions of Python 3.9.0 and you can already try the latest one in Fedora! Test your Python code with 3.9 early to avoid surprises once the final 3.9.0 is out in October.

  • Geany and Geany-Plugins for EPEL8

    If you're a lucky user of a RedHat Enterprise Linux based system, you're probably already aware of the Enterprise Packages for Enterprise Linux from the Fedora Project. In case you've missed the flyweight IDE Geany and it's plugins there this is probably some good news for you: Geany is coming to EPEL8 soon!

Programming an Tutorials: LaTeX, SQL, Python, Rust and More

  • Excellent Free Tutorials to Learn LaTeX

    LaTeX is a professional document preparation system and document markup language written by Leslie Lamport. It’s a very mature system with development starting more than 30 years ago. LaTeX is widely used in the publication of scientific documents in many disciplines, such as mathematics, statistics, physics, economics, political science. It helps an author produce professional looking documents, papers, and books that are perfectly typeset. The formatted works are consistent, accurate, and reusable. It’s particularly suited to the production of long articles and books, as it has facilities for the automatic numbering of chapters, sections, theorems, equations etc., and also has facilities for cross-referencing. LaTeX is not a WYSIWYG system. LaTeX uses the TeX typesetting program for formatting its output. LaTeX is a set of macros for TeX that aims to help the user concentrate on the content, rather than the formatting. Here’s our recommended tutorials to learn LaTeX. If you’re looking for free LaTeX programming books, check here.

  • The 20 Best SQL Books for Beginner and Professional

    SQL is one of the widely used languages in this modern world. To deal with Relational databases, SQL is very necessary. SQL stands for Structured Query Language. It allows a user to insert, update, search, and delete database records. SQL itself isn’t a programming language. However, its standard permits making procedural augmentations for it, which extends it to the usefulness of a develop programming language. Thus, it has become quite essential to own some proper SQL books for learning this language.

  • Tangling multiple files

    I have lately been using org-mode literate programming to generate example code and beamer slides from the same source. I hit a wall trying to re-use functions in multiple files, so I came up with the following hack. Thanks 'ngz' on #emacs and Charles Berry on the org-mode list for suggestions and discussion.

  • PyCharm 2020.1 Out Now

    Rebase your branch with ease, debug smarter, and use a font designed for programming. Download the new version now, or upgrade from within your IDE.

  • How to Provide Test Fixtures for Django Models in Pytest

    If you’re working in Django, pytest fixtures can help you create tests for your models that are uncomplicated to maintain. Writing good tests is a crucial step in sustaining a successful app, and fixtures are a key ingredient in making your test suite efficient and effective. Fixtures are little pieces of data that serve as the baseline for your tests. As your test scenarios change, it can be a pain to add, modify, and maintain your fixtures. But don’t worry. This tutorial will show you how to use the pytest-django plugin to make writing new test cases and fixtures a breeze.

  • This Week In Rust: This Week in Rust 333

    Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved? We love contributions.