Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Say it with me: Linux is not Windows!

Filed under
Linux

Tectonic journalist Richard Frank's column about his sad 300Mhz laptop with 128MB RAM and its slow performance with Linux (Taking a fstab at Linux) caused much wrath and waving of fists among our readers. He bravely took the attack on the chin, and I hope that the experience doesn't slow his inevitable slide into the world of open source.

His situation is not unique. I often hear complaints that Linux runs slower than Windows on the same system. For those of us who run Linux on a reasonably spec'd machine, it raises eyebrows and causes quite a bit of confusion as we know that Linux is so much faster. Obviously Linux does take some configuration to get it running optimally -- it is a hacker's operating system, so you're meant to play with it. But even a clean install of most of the distributions should perform better than clunky old Windows, surely.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Gaming

Leftovers: KDE/Qt

Leftovers: OSS

Security Leftovers

  • DNS server attacks begin using BIND software flaw
    Attackers have started exploiting a flaw in the most widely used software for the DNS (Domain Name System), which translates domain names into IP addresses. Last week, a patch was issued for the denial-of-service flaw, which affects all versions of BIND 9, open-source software originally developed by the University of California at Berkeley in the 1980s.
  • Researchers Create First Firmware Worm That Attacks Macs
    The common wisdom when it comes to PCs and Apple computers is that the latter are much more secure. Particularly when it comes to firmware, people have assumed that Apple systems are locked down in ways that PCs aren’t. It turns out this isn’t true. Two researchers have found that several known vulnerabilities affecting the firmware of all the top PC makers can also hit the firmware of MACs. What’s more, the researchers have designed a proof-of-concept worm for the first time that would allow a firmware attack to spread automatically from MacBook to MacBook, without the need for them to be networked.