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How Do We Introduce FOSS and Linux to Those Who Resist It?

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OSS

There are users who are totally resistant to change. Why? Because it disrupts their workflow. It makes them less productive. Change makes them cranky. However, there are times when change is needed and we have to lobby for it no matter what. If you think about your own home and your budget, sometimes you might think: Heck, the money spent on a license for a certain application could have been used for books of my child. I could have used an open source software of good quality and donated money to that project. I could donate small increments of money to that project instead of a one-time payment which could affect my cashflow in a great way. Or I could even contribute to that project, aside from giving something financial in return.

However, not all people think that way. Most people would still prefer to pay for licenses. Well, or download the application for free. So how now?

But here are some ideas that might help you:

rest here




re: How do we ...

You don't.

Fanboy zealots that feel it's their duty to "introduce" FOSS is the worse thing about the whole Open Source thing.

I'd rather be stuck in a airport with dozens of used car salesmen and door-to-door bible thumpers then listen to some drooling fanboy rave about how great Unoobtu is.

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