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An interview with Clem from Linux Mint

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Linux
Interviews

A few days ago I reviewed what is in my opinion the easiest Linux distribution for Windows switchers: Linux Mint 7.0 The small group of talented people that manage this distribution is led by Clem, the "founder" of Linux Mint. Today he was kind enough to grant me an email interview as a follow up to my review.

Erlik: How did you get started on Linux Mint?

Clem: I've been passionate about Linux since the early days. I started using it as my main operating system in 1996. In the following years I did a lot of distro-hopping and I spent a lot of time helping other users. In 2006 I started selling reviews and tutorials to linuxforums.org (my articles are still available here: http://www.linuxforums.org/bio/author/Clement+Lefebvre/) and I eventually decided to publish them myself, and so the name of my website at the time was linuxmint.com. The more distributions I reviewed the more I felt something was missing and I started to develop a very precise idea of what I would personally like to see in a desktop operating system. I'm a developer myself so I wasn't afraid to develop the missing parts and I started taking what was already there in the Open Source world to build upon it. I chose not to develop my own package base and so I opted to base my little project on top of a Debian distribution. Ubuntu was popular, I would have ported most of their innovations anyway and being compatible with them was a huge advantage, so I chose the Ubuntu package base.

rest here




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