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Open for nominations

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Linux

In Fedora, we have two main bodies of governance that take care of the lion’s share (yes, that was a Leonidas pun, sorry) of decision making where we need specific accountability. One of those is the Fedora Engineering Steering Committee, or FESCo. The other is the Fedora Project Board.

FESCo deals mainly with technical issues arising out of the construction and provision of the Fedora distribution. Its members work with issues such as packaging (through the Packaging Committee), release engineering, and so forth. FESCo also provides a central clearinghouse for any issues arising out of our many Special Interest Groups.

FESCo is a fully community-elected body, and the Board, which has nine seats, is more than half-elected with five of its seats elected by the community. In both cases, we turn over approximately half the seats each release, to ensure some continuity from release to release.

Nominations for these elections are open to the community, and I hope interested individuals will put themselves forward for consideration.

rest here




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