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How we won the open source battle

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OSS

Recently the news about the inevitability of open source has been everywhere. Just today I exchanged tweets with Matt after he blogged:

"Indeed....open source has won.".

Seeing that I've always advocated the happy balance of open source and traditional software used in conjunction to address customer needs, news about A winning over B is somewhat hard to accept.

When I pressed Matt on what he meant by "open source has won," he replied:

"Won in the sense that 5 years ago no one, including IBM, would have thought it would be a part of all software."

Well, IBM was ahead of the game in terms of contributing to and using open source within its products.

rest here




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Python Programming

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today's leftovers

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