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SUSE Studio Builds Customized Linux Appliances in a Flash

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Software

One of the best ways to try out a new Linux distribution is to download a bootable ISO or USB image file and give it a quick spin. VMware added another option. With that introduction came the flood of new Linux-based appliances targeted at the VMware environment.

Building your own custom Linux-based appliance can be tedious. First you have to install the base operating system and then add or delete the packages you want in the final version. Next you must perform a few basic configuration tasks to make sure your system has the right network settings and such. Then you have to actually build and test the VMware image which is not an impossible task but tedious nonetheless.

Automation

Novell's SUSE Studio brings a slick automation process to the world of Linux appliances. All that's needed on your part is a few mouse clicks and fifteen to twenty minutes of your time. Once the process is complete you'll have a fully bootable image to download in one of several formats, including a VMware image.

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