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Mark Sobell on the Bash and the Linux Cli

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Linux

LinuxPlanet: Mark, is the command line dead?

No, not at all. For some people, for some tasks, it is easier and more straightforward to use a graphical interface. It really depends on what you want to do and who you are. The difference between a GUI and the command line is like the difference between an automatic and a stick shift. I drive a stick because it gives me more control over the car and gives me more of a feel of what the car is doing, how it is performing.
Of course this discussion assumes that you are working with files at a basic or system administration level. Some applications have GUIs and may have no, or a very primitive, command line interface. It makes no sense to try to run these apps from the command line.

One thing that is nice about the command line is that it gives you access to hundreds of utilities. Right on the command line you can use a pipe to combine utilities to perform a task that no one utility is set up to do. Here is a quote from my ... Linux Commands, Editors, and Shell Programming book that talks about pipes and how they connect processes:

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