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5 Great GTD Applications for Linux

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Software

There is a popular joke about Linux users that we are so busy tweaking our system to do things for fun that we don’t have time to do important stuff. Getting things done in a structured manner (regardless of your OS) has always been a challenge for me. Writing down things to do on a piece of paper just doesn’t work for me anymore, specially since I spend a lot of time in front of the computer it makes sense to have a GTD application on my desktop I can have access to all the time. So ever since I made the complete move to Linux I tried quite a few organization tools to help me get things done much more efficiently, some of these tools are OS independent but all of them works on Linux. Hopefully you will find some of these apps helpful.

1) Tracks:

Tracks is not your grandma’s to-do app and perhaps thats a good thing. In order to run this app you will need to install and configure mysql (or SQLite3) and Rails; you can run your own web server or use the built in mongreal server. Its not as scary to install as it sounds, even if it was, its totally worth it. Tracks is a very extensive GTD application that works a lot like basecamp. You can host it yourself for personal use or on a public server to collaborate with others on group projects.

2) ThinkingRock:

rest here




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