Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Microsoft denies Xbox issues

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft has denied a report in the British tech publication The Register, that last month's recall of power cords for 14.1 million Xboxes was connected to broken solder joints inside early Xbox consoles.

Charlotte Stuyvenberg, director of global communications for the Xbox, said the report was incorrect. The problem with the power cord and the solder joints were mutually exclusive, she said.

A Microsoft statement sent earlier said: "In rare cases, solder joints have broken. This issue is not associated with the power cord replacement program..."

The statement came the same day that The Register reported that an Xbox had blown up in a user's face in Sweden even though the power cord had been replaced.

Ms Stuyvenberg said this incident was being dealt with separately. "Our people have got hold of this console to investigate the circumstances which caused it," she said.

According to hardware experts quoted in The Register, the problem is not with the power cable, but rather with the power supply on certain models.

The experts were quoted as saying that the new cable only made the problem worse; the meltdown and fire risk were caused by wear and tear on the power supply used in early models and the new replacement cables only contained a trip that reduced the risk of a fire but left users with a console which was literally fried.

In enthusiast forums, such as the Xbox Scene, there are plenty of complaints about the problem.
Postings are accompanied by screenshots to show the areas where owners claim the solder has worn off in earlier models and caused the problem.

Ms Stuvyenberg said the Swedish case was a "one of a kind situation," and there was nothing wrong with the Foxline power supplies, the ones which users have named as being those from which solder was wearing off and posing a fire risk.

She said the question of broken solder joints would be covered under a warranty. All Xbox consoles had been designed so that a broken solder joint did not present any safety issue.
Several Xbox users have reported that the v1.0 and v1.1 power supplies, not the cable, is to blame for the issue. Users of later Xbox versions are also getting replacement cables even though the machines aren't faulty.

An online petition, which claims that the recall of the power cords is a cover-up of the real problem, has now collected 1779 signatures.
A Swedish newspaper appears to have been the first to publicise the actual problem.

There have been problems with the Xbox in the past. In February 2002, soon after the console went on sale in Japan, there were complaints from customers about it scratching game and film discs.

The discs and DVD movies came out scratched after being removed from the Xbox, though in most cases the discs were still playable.

At the timer Microsoft said that the scratching affected "significantly less than 1 percent of systems sold."

The complaints in Japan came after a few reports of defective units in North America, where the Xbox went on sale in November 2001.

Source.

More in Tux Machines

Debian GNU/Linux 9.1 "Stretch" Live & Installable ISOs Now Available to Download

As we reported the other day, the Debian Project unveiled the first point release of the Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system, but no installation or live ISOs were made available to download. That changes today, July 23, 2017, as the Debian CD team lead by Steve McIntyre has prepared the new installation images of Debian GNU/Linux 9.1 "Stretch" for 64-bit (amd64), 32-bit (i386), PowerPC 64-bit Little Endian (ppc64el), ARM64 (AArch64), ARMhf, Armel, MIPS, MIPS 64-bit Little Endian (mips64el), MIPSEL, and IBM System z (s390x) hardware architectures. Multi-arch images supporting both 32-bit and 64-bit (i386 and amd64) PCs are also available for download, along with a set of twelve source ISO images. On the other hand, the Debian GNU/Linux 9.1 "Stretch" Live ISOs come in the usual flavors with the GNOME, KDE, Xfce, LXDE, MATE, and Cinnamon desktop environments, supporting both 32-bit and 64-bit architectures. Read more Also: Debian 9.1 GNU/Linux Released With 26 Security Fixes

4MLinux 23.0 BETA released.

4MLinux 23.0 BETA is ready for testing. Basically, at this stage of development, 4MLinux BETA has the same features as 4MLinux STABLE, but it provides a huge number of updated packages, including a major change in the core of the system, which now uses the GNU C Library 2.25. Read more Also: 4MLinux 23 Slated for Release in November 2017, to Be Supported Until July 2018

Review: Calculate Linux 17.6 KDE

Calculate Linux is a Gentoo-based distribution. The project's slogan is "Easy Linux from the source," which refers to the fact that Calculate is relatively easy to use but still benefits from Gentoo's powerful and flexible source-based Portage package manager. Calculate recently celebrated its tenth birthday and released Calculate Linux 17.6. The distro comes in four flavours; apart from a desktop and server edition there's Calculate Scratch ("for those who want to build a customized system that works for them") and Calculate Media Center ("for your home multimedia center"). Each version is available for the x86_64 and i686 architectures and uses SysV init rather than systemd. The desktop edition has ISOs for the KDE, Cinnamon, MATE and Xfce desktop environments - GNOME is presumably not available because of its dependency on systemd. I opted for the 64-bit KDE version, which is just over 2GB in size. Read more

Linux 4.13 RC2

  • Linux 4.13-rc2
    Things are chugging along, and we actually had a reasonably active rc2. Normally rc2 is really small because people are taking a breaher and haven't started finding bugs yet, but this time around we have a bigger-than-average rc2. We'll just have to see how that translates to the rest of the release cycle, but I suspect it's just the normal variability in this thing (and because I released -rc1 one day early, I guess rc2 was one day longer than usual despite the normal Sunday release). Changes all over, although the diffstat is dominated by the new vboxvideo staging driver. I shouldn't have let it through, but Greg, as we all know, is "special". Also, Quod licet Iovi, and all that jazz - Greg gets to occasionally break some rules. If you just ignore that new staging driver, the remainder is still about half driver patches (networking, rdma, scsi, usb). The rest looks normal too: architecture updates (x86, sparc, powerpc), filesystem (nfs, overlayfs, misc), networking and core kernel. And some new bpf testcode. Time for some more testing, people. You know the drill. Linus
  • Linux 4.13-rc2 Released, A "Reasonably Active" Update
    The second release candidate of the Linux 4.13 kernel is now available for testing.
  • The Kernel Put On Some Weight With Linux 4.13
    Here are some numbers about how much weight the kernel gained during the Linux 4.13 merge window that closed last week.