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Linux in Italian Schools, Part 5: Slackware in Sardinia

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Linux

One teacher's willingness to dive into free software is helping the entire school to use a network that is newer, more secure and more diverse in its application--and the students love it.

The Professional Institute for Agriculture and Environment, Sante Cettolini, is spread over six little cities in the southwestern corner of the wonderful island of Sardinia. The six cities are Santadi, Villamassargia, Villacidro, Senorbì, Muravera and Maracalagonis. Until this past spring, the entire institute ran only proprietary software for Windows. There was no real interest in free software or in computer security, for that matter. This was not a deliberate attitude, though, but a lack of interest in computers as educational instruments.

Last year, however, things started to take a different turn at the School Seat, which is located in Villacidro.

Full Story.

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