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OCZ Behemoth Laser Gaming Mouse

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Hardware

Last year we reviewed the OCZ Alchemy Elixir, which was the first keyboard we looked at from this company that once was just known for their system memory and power supplies but since have ventured into all sorts of gaming products. The OCZ Alchemy Elixir was a nice keyboard, but now joining their peripherals line-up is the OCZ Behemoth -- a laser gaming mouse with a 4-way LED display, 18 grams worth of customizable weights, and an adjustable DPI sensor.

Features:

- 2-Way Scroll wheel
- Buttons: Standard 5 + 1 DPI Toggle Switch
- Hot Key: 1 Mode Switch
- Dimensions: 118mm x 71mm x 44mm (L X W X H)
- Weight: up to 159g (adjustable)
- DPI: 800-1600-2400-3200
- 4-way changing LED display
- Tracking speed: 60IPS
- Acceleration: 50G
- MCU: On board Memory
- Programmable Functions for Keyboard Command saving
- 18g Customizable weights
- Interface: USB 2.0 / Full speed
- Includes Customization Software, Programmable Buttons

rest here




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