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Firefox 1.5 Release Candidate 3

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Firefox 1.5 Release Candidate 3 is now available for download. This is the third release candidate of our next generation Firefox browser.

What's New in Firefox 1.5 RC 3

Firefox 1.5 RC 3 is a test preview of our award-winning Web browser. Firefox 1.5 RC 3 is available for our testing community, Web site and Web application developers, and our Extension developers.

Here's what's new in Firefox 1.5 RC 3:

  • Automated update to streamline product upgrades. Notification of an update is more prominent, and updates to Firefox may now be half a megabyte or smaller. Updating extensions has also improved.
  • Faster browser navigation with improvements to back and forward button performance.
  • Drag and drop reordering for browser tabs.
  • Improvements to popup blocking.
  • Clear Private Data feature provides an easy way to quickly remove personal data through a menu item or keyboard shortcut.
  • is added to the search engine list.
  • Improvements to product usability including descriptive error pages, redesigned options menu, RSS discovery, and "Safe Mode" experience.
  • Better accessibility including support for DHTML accessibility and assistive technologies such as the Window-Eyes 5.5 beta screen reader for Microsoft Windows. Screen readers read aloud all available information in applications and documents or show the information on a Braille display, enabling blind and visually impaired users to use equivalent software functionality as their sighted peers.
  • Report a broken Web site wizard to report Web sites that are not working in Firefox.
  • Better support for Mac OS X (10.2 and greater) including profile migration from Safari and Mac Internet Explorer.
  • New support for Web Standards including SVG, CSS 2 and CSS 3, and JavaScript 1.6.
  • Many security enhancements.
  • List of notable bug fixes since Firefox 1.5 Beta 2

Download Page.

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