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What's Wrong with Linux?

Filed under
Linux

Linux servers are ready for prime time and most web sites run on them. This article examines Linux desktop problems.

I've used Linux for a little over a year now, from the perspective of a power Windows user. I can do almost anything on my Linux system that a Windows XP or Mac user can do on his system. My system is reliable, stable, and far safer from malware/intrusion than Microsoft products. I can watch almost any multimedia product, same as a Windows or Mac user. I have both a drive mirror and DVD-R backup sets for backup.

I run Windows on my Linux workstation via Win4Lin emulation, which allows me to run an actual copy of Windows concurrently with Linux. But all I really run on Windows day to day are Eudora (email), Microsoft Office, and graphics software—everything else I do in Linux.

Is the Linux Desktop Ready for You?

Full Story.

Use Linspire

If you use a newbie friendly like Linspire, Linux is actually easier to use than Windows, if you are doing anything beyond just playing games on your computer. As far as being as easy to use as the Mac, maybe in the KDE 4.0 era and whatever Gnome comes up with at that time.

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GNOME News: Black Lab Drops GNOME and Further GNOME Experiments in Meson

  • Ubuntu-Based Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.0.1 Drops GNOME 3 for MATE Desktop
    Coming about two weeks after the release of Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11, which is based on the Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system using the HWE (hardware enablement) kernel from Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak), Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.0.1 appears to be an unexpected maintenance update addressing a few important issues reported by users lately.
  • 3.26 Developments
    My approach to development can often differ from my peers. I prefer to spend the early phase of a cycle doing lots of prototypes of various features we plan to implement. That allows me to have the confidence necessary to know early in the cycle what I can finish and where to ask for help.
  • Further experiments in Meson
    Meson is definitely getting more traction in GNOME (and other projects), with many components adding support for it in parallel to autotools, or outright switching to it. There are still bugs, here and there, and we definitely need to improve build environments — like Continuous — to support Meson out of the box, but all in all I’m really happy about not having to deal with autotools any more, as well as being able to build the G* stack much more quickly when doing continuous integration.

Fedora and Red Hat