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5 Useful Desktop Managers for Linux

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Software

Today I’m going to write about some of the most useful alternative desktop managers you should consider using on your operating system. To start off I have:

Xfce

Xfce is a fast and a light desktop environment for unix like operating systems. It is specially desgined to improve your work productivity. It has the ability to load and execute applications really fast while conserving system resources.

It consists of a number of components that provide the full functionality one can expect of a modern desktop environment. They are packaged separately and you can pick among the available packages to create the optimal personal working environment.

Xfce can be installed on several UNIX platforms. It is known to compile on Linux, NetBSD, FreeBSD, OpenBSD, Solaris, Cygwin and MacOS X, on x86, PPC and more.

rest here




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