Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

4 Ways to Create CD/DVD ISO Images in Ubuntu

In this guide I will show how to create CD/DVD ISO images in Ubuntu using four easy methods.

1. Create ISO Images With K3b
K3b is the KDE default CD/DVD burner and also one of the most popular (if not the most popular) burning application for Linux. The current version comes installed by default in Kubuntu 8.10 and 9.04, but if you are using Ubuntu and want to get install it issue the following command:

sudo apt-get install k3b

A port for KDE4 is in the works too, but until now there is no stable release.

To create an ISO image just fire up K3b and follow the steps below:

Go to File -> New Project -> New Data CD Project (or New Data DVD Project, depending on what size the image you want to create will have):

Next, drag and drop the files and folders from the file browser to the bottom area:

Now, click the Burn button and, in the window that appears, tick the Only create image option under the Settings widget. The image will be created by default as the /tmp/kde-YOUR_USERNAME/image_name.iso, but you can change this location in the Image tab.

Next, click on Start and wait for the image to be created. This should be all.

Here's what the file /var/kde-embryo/my_iso_image.iso shows:

embryo@kubu:~$ file /tmp/kde-embryo/my_iso_image.iso
/tmp/kde-embryo/my_iso_image.iso: ISO 9660 CD-ROM filesystem data 'my_iso_image '

2. Create ISO images with Brasero
Brasero is the default CD/DVD burning application in Ubuntu. The way Brasero creates images is similar with K3b's. If you don't have Brasero installed for some reason, type:

sudo apt-get install brasero

Start Brasero (or fire it up, as you wish to call it) and click on the Data project button (or go to Project -> New Project -> New Data Project).

Change the name of the disc at the bottom to whatever you like and then click on the green plus sign in the upper left corner in the toolbar to start adding files and directories to your image:

After you finished adding files click on Burn and make sure no empty CD/DVD is in your optical drives:

This should be all. The image will be located in the home directory.

3. Create ISO images using AcetoneISO2
AcetoneISO2 is a GUI (graphical user interface) application built in Qt4 for mounting and unmounting CD/DVD ISO (NRG, MDF and BIN too) images, but it can also be used to create ISO images.

To install AcetoneISO2 in Ubuntu you can follow the guide I put up a while ago, here. I will use version 2.0.2 for this example.

First, put all the files and folders you want included in the image into a new, empty directory. Next, in the menu go to Conversion -> Generate ISO from folder, select the desired folder and enter the name of the image:

That's it.

4. Create ISO images using command-line
What, you thought I was going to leave CLI behind? Here's (probably) the easiest way to create ISO images using command-line interface.

First, install the tool called genisoimage (if you already have Brasero or K3b installed, this package is probably already installed):

sudo apt-get install genisoimage

Use it like this:

http://tuxarena.blogspot.com

More in Tux Machines

KDE Applications 14.12 - New Features, Frameworks Ports

Today KDE released KDE Applications 14.12, delivering new features and bug fixes to more than a hundred applications. Most of these applications are based on KDE Development Platform 4 but the first applications have been ported to KDE Frameworks 5. Frameworks is a set of modularized libraries providing additional functionality for Qt5, the latest version of the popular Qt cross-platform application framework. KDE app dragons This release marks the beginning of a new style of releases replacing the threesome of KDE Workspaces, Platform and Applications in the 4 series which ended with the latest KDE Applications update last month. Read more

What To Expect In 2015: Robots Join The Open-Source Revolution

The number of downloads doubled in 2014, to 3.5 million, and Gerkey expects adoption to spike again with the release of ROS 2.0 this summer. The upgrade will coordinate swarms, improve walking, and support smart sensors—basically, assimilate the world’s robots. Read more

New Input Drivers Coming For Linux 3.19 Kernel

One of the latest pull requests for the Linux 3.19 kernel is the input driver subsystem pull, which includes numerous updates along with a few new drivers. The new drivers will benefit some Google Chromebooks in running the latest upstream kernel. Read more

Docker and the Linux container ecosystem

Linux container technology is experiencing tremendous momentum in 2014. The ability to create multiple lightweight, self-contained execution environments on the same Linux host simplifies application deployment and management. By improving collaboration between developers and system administrators, container technology encourages a DevOps culture of continuous deployment and hyperscale, which is essential to meet current user demands for mobility, application availability, and performance. Read more