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Ubuntu 9.04 vs Fedora 11: A lot can change in one month

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Linux
Ubuntu

The excitement has already started in anticipation of Q2 2009 l distro releases. As usual, the big names are Ubuntu 9.04 (a.ka. Jaunty Jackalope) and Fedora 11 (Leonidas). It's time for a straight off comparison on the upcoming features of these two distros.

I have not mentioned minor version numbers of most packages, since it is subject to change in the final release.

Fedora 11
Code named Leonidas
Scheduled Release Date: May 26, 2009
Current Status: Alpha, Beta to be released on March 31 2009

Ubuntu 9.04
Code named Jaunty Jackalope
Scheduled Release Date: April 23, 2009
Current Status: Alpha 6, Beta to be released on March 26 2009

Linux Kernel
Ubuntu - 2.6.28
Fedora - 2.6.29

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Innovation Sparks Jealousy

californiaquantum.wordpress: I’m finding increased jealousy toward Fedora every day especially when someone points out how well Fedora is innovating.

Case and point, take this article I just read Ubuntu 9.04 vs Fedora 11: A lot can change in one month! The article concludes:

Ubuntu, as usual, has been rock stable for me… But considering the differences - Fedora 11 seems to be a full 6 months ahead of Ubuntu…. Ubuntu sure has some catching up to do. When Ubuntu 9.10 releases, I can’t even begin to imagine how far ahead Fedora 12 will be!

Now look at the comments:

First, take Inconsiderate Clod:

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