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Getting Rid of Nasty Flash Cookies on Linux

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Software

Flash cookies are the secret nasties of using the Flash player on any platform. These are somewhat like the ordinary HTTP cookies that Web sites infest on our systems. Some HTTP cookies have useful purposes, such as storing the contents of shopping carts and other session information that is actually helpful to us lowly users. But the majority of HTTP cookies are tracking cookies, following us on our travels around the Web, collecting and collating data without our consent and for purposes that do not benefit us. Marketers have no shame when it comes to newer and more inventive ways to spy and track on our movements, and putting together identifying data from diverse sites. Just think if all of that ingenuity were channeled into developing good products that people actually want, and marketing them in ways that were not obnoxious...oh I know, that's crazy talk, so let's move on.

The correct name for Flash cookies is Local Shared Objects, or LSOs, but we'll call them Flash cookies anyway. There are two ways to manage them-- the Adobe way, and the Linux way. Today we'll learn the Adobe way, and then on Friday we'll learn the excellent Linux way.

I think Flash cookies are one of the primary reasons for Adobe's reluctance to open-source the Flash player. I think it is time to give Gnash a serious try.

rest here




I hate nasty cookies.

I hate nasty cookies.

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