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Review: Qimo Linux for Kids

Filed under
Linux

It is the endeavor of nearly every parent out there to try and find interesting and engaging activities for their children to do. But activities cost money, as do toys, games, and other learning tools. That's why it's important to find things that are either low cost or free, and yet can still provide the child with everything they need to learn and be entertained.

But when it comes to computer operating systems, what is there available that actually provides the tools required to engage a child and help them to learn? Until recently, there wasn't much. However, Qimo has changed that. So what can this do for your child or grandchild? Let's have a look and see what fun things are hiding under the hood.

Live CD

The Qimo cd comes with two modes: LiveCD and Install. The first option, which is aptly named “Run Qimo from your computer without installing anything” simplifies the understanding of a LiveCD down to the bare basics. IE, it's an OS that runs from a disk but doesn't mess with your computer.

The LiveCD itself is a little slow getting going, and takes a bit to get past the hardware detection and into the full boot sequence.

rest here




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