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GNOME 2.26: Fast & Stable, But Light On The New Features

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Software

If there’s one thing we can count on in the world of Linux and open source more than anything else, it’s that we can expect a new release of GNOME every six months, and for it to be picked up by the popular GNOME-based distributions (such as Fedora and Ubuntu) shortly thereafter. And let’s face it, GNOME is a very stable and fast desktop environment that’s easy to love. Not to disappoint, GNOME 2.26 is here right on schedule and was released last week. However, a lack of exciting new features prevents it from becoming an all-star.

Another thing we can count on is GNOME’s simplicity. New features aren’t added for the sole purpose of adding new things, new features are added only as necessary. The KISS mentality of GNOME (keep it simple stupid) used to be refreshing, however I feel that it’s starting to hurt more than help, and GNOME 2.26 is showing signs of this.

At first glance, it would be very hard to tell this version of GNOME apart from any other, as the same Clearlooks theme is used yet again. Granted, many people change the default theme before anything else, yet first impressions matter more than you’d think. Clearlooks is great and has served us well, however it’s time for something new.

The second thing you may (or may not) notice is GNOME’s speed.

rest here




Features.

I think the only part of GNOME that's lacking in features is metacity.

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