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John C. Dvorak's Microsoft Murder Plot: "How to Kill Linux"

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Linux
Microsoft

John C Dvorak's PC Magazine article called "How to Kill Linux," introduced the world to what he called "the lopped-off head approach" - the head being that of Linux, and the beheader being Microsoft.

Dvorak's notion is that, since the key to competitive success is to gain dominant market share with a proprietary product, all Microsoft needs to neuter Linux is to usher "MS-Linux" into the world, then cut the driver layer out of Windows and attach it to Linux directly.

"If Microsoft actually produced an MS-Linux that was the standard Linux attached to the driver layer of Windows, giving users full Plug and Play (PnP) support of all their peripherals, nobody would buy any other Linux on the market."

Full Article.

No MS in my Linux

He misses the point that people are using Linux mainly so they don't have Windows (virus) compatibility to delete their files and Windows filesystems to corrupt their drives, spyware to leak their sensitive information, plug and pray malfunctions that they lose the ability to access their peripherals, and the windows registry to slow down, corrupt, cause weird problems, and make their system inoperable with just routine use. The biggest point why Linux users wouldn't use that is because Microsoft has lost all credibility and no one trusts them any more.

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