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U.S. Schools: Not Ready For Linux

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Linux

US schools are not yet ready for Linux. Yes sad to say, it is not because they can’t do Linux or don’t need a feasible, safe and renewable source for technology. US schools are not ready to accept Linux because they don’t feel the need.

1. Teachers Resistant to Change

You may be shocked to know that most teachers really look at technology as an evil requirement. Teachers feel overburdened with creating lesson plans, managing ever increasing problems with students, left with little energy or desire to learn new technology. Even proposing the idea of Linux will be met with heavy resistance just because it means change.

2. Teachers are Not Accountable for Technology

rest here




re: Schools

Nicely written, but misses the MAIN reason.

Schools do not teach/use Linux for the same reason they don't teach Latin over English - no real world connection.

With Desktop Linux market share hovering around zero, why would any school prepare their students to use it? Ask 1000 graphic design shops and see how many use GIMP/Inkscape. Ask 1000 business offices and see how many use MS Office vs Open Office or KDE Office. Ask 1000 CPA's and see how many use GNUcash instead of QuickBooks. See a trend?

Schools are to prep students for real life. Like it or not, Linux is not even close to being mainstream, therefore it has NO place in general education.

re: US Schools

Linux is not making many strides in schools (on the desktop), but other FLOSS software is.

In many schools, teachers are starting to use The Gimp, Inkscape, OpenOffice.org, Python & Ruby, Filezilla, and, of course, Mozilla Firefox.

Partly the reason is that school district information service staff do not want to maintain and service Linux on the desktop. They want to simplify their lives and only support one OS on the desktop, and that's Microsoft Windows, for the reasons vonskippy stated above.

Some US school districts are using Linux in a server role, but other than a scant few using LTSP (Linux Terminal Server Project), desktop deployments of Linux in US Schools are scarce.

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