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Who should Software Freedom sue on FAT32?

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Once upon a time I was going to be a lawyer.

One reason I didn’t go that way was to avoid running down rabbit holes like the one our own Jason Perlow offered us Thursday. (This puzzle called Down the Rabbit Hole is now on sale over at Legendary Toys.)

Microsoft owns FAT32, but it didn’t appear to pursue its rights against companies that supported FAT32 in their Linux thumb drives and consumer electronics.

Until the TomTom case. At which point Jeremy Allison of Samba says Microsoft had secret cross-licensing deals with all those other guys which violate the GPL.

So the question becomes, who should Software Freedom sue?


I haven't used MS software since 2004.
I think free software shouldn't use FAT32.
It's tough or maybe even unrealistic but the solution is to stop nagging and come up with an alternative to FAT32 in removable media.

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