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ATI v8.19.10 Linux Performance

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Hardware
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Since NVIDIA's 1.0-7676 Linux driver release on August 11 of this year, we have not yet seen a newest release candidate, which happens to be the feature-filled 1.0-8XXX series. Although the Rel80 Linux drivers should be available any day now, ATI has offered several new driver releases in this short three-month period. ATI had originally aimed for a bi-monthly driver release, but lately we've seen this time-frame shorten dramatically with these recent releases and ATI has come out with one of, if not, the best track records for releasing their latest improvements on a timely basis. Keep in mind, however, that the Linux drivers still do not support the ATI X1000 series, CrossFire, or a similar CATALYST Control Center to that of Windows. Even though the v8.18.8 Linux drivers had not offered a great deal of improvements over the v8.18.6 drivers (mainly distribution enhancements), the newest drivers we have with us today (v8.19.10) offer a fair amount of changes. In this article today, we will be focusing upon the frame-rate performance of not only their latest release but also that of the three previous versions - v8.16.20, v8.18.6, and v8.18.8. In another upcoming article, we will also be bringing fourth an exclusive preview as to ATI's mobile capabilities with their latest graphics drivers. Below are ATI's official release notes for their latest drivers.

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