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Deep in Microsoft’s TomTom Linux patent claims

TomTom and FAT

Why do not TomTom and all the rest just format the SD cards as ext3. I know it is convenient to be able to just plug them into a Windows box for updates, but all TomTom need to do is add an ext3 Windows driver (readily available) to their install software and the cards would function transparently. Many of my SD cards are formatted as ext3 as they are only used in a Linux environment, and they all work on insertion just like they did when they were fat32.

Just a thought. Maybe a TomTom user can come up with a reason not to do this, but it would not be a problem with my Laser GPS.

GregE
Melbourne, Australia

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