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Media Giddy over Linux Worm

Filed under
Linux

You might think that the sky is falling the way the media has gone on a feeding frenzy related to a Linux worm. Sorry to disappoint you, but the worm will hardly affect the user base. It's not like the "Code Red" worm which self-replicated malicious code that exploited a known vulnerability in Microsoft IIS servers (CA-2001-13). Rumor has it, Wal-Mart didn't cope with it very well.

Link.

Well can you blame 'em?

I mean if I were a reporter covering IT for a living I'd be bored too; having to always run stories about the latest bug attacking Microshaft day-in and day-out. Imagine the excitement of typing new words like SuSE, Ubuntu, Knoppix, and Mandriva. Going home to your honey and being able to have something interesting to talk about at the dinner table.

But then of course it would be short lived. Lasting about as long as a pint of Haagen-Dazs in Kirsti Alleys freezer. =)

*******
http://myfirstlinux.com

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