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Costs, culture or communism? Why governments choose open source

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ZDNet UK has just concluded an investigation into why some governments have embraced open source, while others have given it the cold-shoulder.

The special report, published on Tuesday, examines why some countries have an almost-zealous approch to open source which is driven by more than cold, hard economics - politics, culture and protectionism all have a part to play.

The UK public sector's hesitance to adopt open source is attributed by some to the lack of political support. "We've been pathetic as a nation in supporting and understanding open source. [Tony] Blair's Labour has dragged us away from it," said one analyst.

Despite leading the way in technology innovation, the United States government has hung back from adopting open source, compared with some countries in Europe.

Full Story.

Europe and the US philosophically divided on open source?.

vote down taxes

Anyone who doesn't at least consider Open Source has too much money. I recommend voting down all taxes until the government seriously considers using Open Source technology.

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