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Preview: Three Trends At Southern California Linux Expo (SCALE)

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Linux

As the Southern California Linux Expo (SCALE) prepares to kick-off February 20 in Los Angeles, The VAR Guy did some preliminary poking around. He wanted to see if there were any key trends worth nothing for open source solutions providers. The result? Take a look at these three anticipated trends and themes from SCALE.

1. Canonical’s Relatively Low Profile: Community manager Jono Bacon is expected to attend, local Canonical employees may attend and Ubuntu fans will participate in an Ubuntu Bug Jam. But a Canonical spokesman says the company won’t likely announce any Ubuntu news at the event. Sources say the company is hard at work on a new server push as well as new initiatiaves involving Landscape — a remote management tool for Ubuntu desktops, laptops and servers. Over the long haul, Landscape could emerge as a tool for VARs and solutions providers to maintain and troubleshoot customers’ Ubuntu networks. Stay tuned for the server and Lanscape initiatives this spring.

2. Zenoss Community Day:

rest here

Also: Red Hat and the Fedora Project to Present at Southern California Linux Expo




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