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Installing OpenOffice.org 2.0 for Debian

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HowTos

In this introductory article, Jon Watson provides an easy guide to installing the new Open Office source on non-rpm Linux systems. The emphasis is on the use of alien to help convert rpm packages for quick installation to the latest Debian releases.

While the recent release of OpenOffice.org 2.0 (OOo) was eagerly anticipated by the open source community, it has been received with some chagrin. The OOo group released 2.0 in rpm format only. Needless to say, this has some non-rpm GNU/Linux users up in arms. What if you're a poor Debian user like me? Will I ever get to run OOo 2.0?

Yes! Take heart, for what follows is a tale of how I installed OOo 2.0 on my Kanotix Debian box.

Full Article.

do optional registration

When I completed the optional registration a Debian package as well as a native Mac version and better graphics engine were my top requested features. I encourage all to "register". You don't have to leave name or email if you don't want to. But you can request features and give other feeback - I recommend all who would ever consider a Debian based distribution (there are many like Linspire, Xandros, Ubuntu, MEPIS, Knoppix, Libranet to name a few) to request that as one of your top feature requests.

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