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update on tuxmachines issues

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I wanted to update folks on our issues of downtime and hosting, as well as personally thank those who have contributed funds to help offset the cost of hosting.

I've decided to give the hosting company that I had made a deal with a second chance. I had worked out a deal to get a dedicated server with 2 gigs of ram for a discount with free advertising. They have explained what happened and assured me that won't happen again and that tuxmachines would be one of their "priority customers" for future issues. So, let's give 'em a chance.

However, believe it or not, bundling my phone, cable, and internet isn't significantly cheaper (as I was lead to believe) than using bellsouth business dsl and having cable tv through Charter. So, I will still feel the extra cost of this hosting even with the discount and ask that folks please keep me in mind as the months roll by. Please try to contribute as you can.

Speaking of which, I want to thank those generous individuals who have contributed so far. I wish I could think of special priviledges or something to give these folks, but I guess my eternal gratitude is all I have. Their generosity did encourage me to get to work finishing moving the site and to bring it online. Please consider joining these contributors on my Wall of Appreciation.

Of course this means at some point in the next few days we will probably be offline due to DNS resolution. I will post the numerical IP when I get ready to make the official change over. Cross your fingers that it will be a stable, fast, and responsive site. Again, we may have to end up shopping around, but let's see how it goes.

I'll try to keep you updated.

Thanks,
susan

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re: Charter

Here's another reason to find a new permanent-esque hosting home for Tuxmachines.org

http://tech.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=09/02/05/1913206

re: charter

bastards! I made a point of asking about that. I have the 16M, but still. The 60 isn't available here and I probably couldn't afford it anyway.

Maybe I better pay that last bellsouth bill afterall. Big Grin

re: charter

Charter to File Bankruptcy Soon (Link)

Best move to Plan B (or is that G or H or Sleepy for your site hosting sometime soon, because you know once the penny pinching begins, besides bandwidth caps, they're sure to start blocking server ports.

re: Charter

yeah, I read about it. Lintonluck, as we say in the family. Big Grin

update update

Well, I guess host color ain't gonna work out afterall. Back to the drawing board...

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