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10 Things I Hate About (U)NIX

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UNIX was a terrific workhorse for its time, but eventually the old nag needs to be put out to pasture. David Chisnall argues that it's time to retire UNIX in favor of modern systems with a lot more horsepower.

In the last decade, free clones and derivatives of UNIX have started to take over from the old-guard UNIX systems. In terms of source code, these versions share very little, if anything, with their predecessors, but in terms of design and philosophy a lot can be traced back to the original roots.

UNIX has a lot of strengths, but like any other design it's starting to show its age. Some of the points listed in this article apply less to some UNIX-like systems, some apply more.

Full Story.

exponentially better, foss

Well Windows NT was showing its age back in the early 90s and people will be using it for many more years. *NIX is light years ahead of anything Microsoft will ever come out with. Until somebody comes out with something exponentially better and open sources it, Linux and the BSDs will be around for many many more decades and will be increasing their marketshare at a steady rate.

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