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original content

This began as a list of original articles found on tuxmachines.org, either by me or someone else, but it has since morphed into a list of original articles found on tuxmachines.org and the articles I've had published elsewhere.

  1. Linux Tycoon: Design and Manage Your Own Distribution - March 31, 2012
  2. Ubuntu 12.04 Beta 2 Arrives for Testing - March 29, 2012
  3. GNOME 3.4 Released with Lots of Improvement - March 28, 2012
  4. Greg K-H Updates Tumbleweed Status - March 27, 2012
  5. LibreOffice 3.4.6 Released - March 22, 2012
  6. openSUSE 12.2 M2, Better Late than Never - March 21, 2012
  7. Mitchell Baker Says H.264 is About User Experience - March 19, 2012
  8. LibreOffice 3.5.1 Released with Fixes - March 18, 2012
  9. Mageia 2 Beta 2, Still No Live Images - March 16, 2012
  10. KDE Spark Tablet Renamed to Honor Classical Composer - March 15, 2012
  11. Final Debian 5 Update Released - March 13, 2012
  12. Arch Turns Ten - Mar 12, 2012
  13. Raspberry Pi Orders Now Being Accepted - Feb 29, 2012
  14. Upcoming GNOME 3.4 Previewed - Feb 28, 2012
  15. Fedora's Beefy Miracle Sizzling with Alpha 1 - Feb 28, 2012
  16. Amnesia, Scariest Game Ever, to Get Sequel - Feb 24, 2012
  17. Intel Joins TDF, Adds LibreOffice to AppUp Center - Feb 23, 2012
  18. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.7 to 5.8 Risk Report - Feb 21, 2012
  19. The Document Foundation Incorporated in Germany - Feb 20, 2012
  20. KDE Spark Tablet Pre-Order Registration Open - Feb 16, 2012
  21. LibreOffice 3.5 Released - Feb 14, 2012
  22. Debian GNU/Linux 5.0 Reaches End of Life - Feb 10, 2012
  23. Pardus Future Uncertain, Fork Probable - Feb 07, 2012
  24. PCLinuxOS 2012.2 Released - Feb 02, 2012
  25. openSUSE has a Dream - Jan 31, 2012
  26. Mandriva Bankruptcy Crisis Averted, For Now - Jan 30, 2012
  27. GhostBSD 2.5 - Now with an Easy Graphic Installer - Jan 26, 2012
  28. Gentoo-based Toorox Releases 01.2012 GNOME Edition - Jan 25, 2012
  29. Mandriva Decision Delayed Again - Jan 23, 2012
  30. Xfce's Early April Fool's Joke - Jan 20, 2012
  31. KDE 4.9 to get a New Widgets Explorer - Jan 19, 2012
  32. Meet Bodhi's Bulky Brother: Bloathi - Jan 18, 2012
  33. Mandriva Delays Bankruptcy Decision - Jan 17, 2012
  34. LibreOffice 3.4.5 Released - Jan 16, 2012
  35. Fedora Running Beefy Contest - Jan 13, 2012
  36. Mageia 2 Inches Along with Another Alpha - Jan 12, 2012
  37. Linux Mint 12 KDE Almost Ready - Jan 11, 2012
  38. Greg KH Posts Status of Kernel Tree - Jan 10, 2012
  39. Unused LibreOffice Code Expunged - Jan 9, 2012
  40. Is Mandriva Finished This Time? - Jan 5, 2012
  41. New aptosid Fork, siduction 11.1 Released - Jan 4, 2012
  42. Lefebvre Introduces GNOME 3 Fork - Jan 3, 2012
  43. Gentoo Gets New Year's Release - Jan 2, 2012










More in Tux Machines

KDE/Qt: Qt 3D, Kube/Kolab, GSoC, and Atelier (3-D Printing)

  • What a mesh!
    With all the advances being made in Qt 3D, we wanted to create some new examples showing some of what it can do. To get us started, we decided to use an existing learning framework, so we followed the open source Tower Defence course, which you can find at CGCookie. Being a game, it allows an interactive view of everything at work, which is very useful.
  • Last week in Kube
    Perhaps if Windows wasn’t such a PITA there would be more progress
  • GSoC 2018: Week 4 & 5
    The last 2 weeks were mainly dedicatd for reviews and testing and thanks to my mentors, I passed the first evaluation with good work till now. Some significant changes were made on discussion with my mentors during the last 2 weeks in the code and some new features.
  • Giving Atelier some Love
    I work for atelier together with Chris, Lays and Patrick for quite a while, but I was basically being the “guardian angel” of the project being invocked when anything happened or when they did not know how to proceed (are you a guardian angel of a project? we have many that need that) For instance I’v done the skeleton for the plugin system, the buildsystem and some of the modules in the interface, but nothing major as I really lacked the time and also lacked a printer.

Proprietary Software on GNU/Linux

  • Winepak – Install Windows Apps and Games on Linux via Flatpak
    A reason for Linux not being more used as added in the comments section of a recent article is “Adobe and Games“. Well, there is a latest Linux bad guy in town and it is here to comfort us in a cooler way than Wine.
  • Mark Text Markdown Editor Adds Sidebar And Tabs Support
    Mark Text is a somewhat new free and open source Electron Markdown editor for Windows, Mac and Linux, which supports the CommonMark Spec and the GitHub Flavored Markdown Spec. The app features a seamless live preview using Snabbdom as the render engine, multiple edit modes (Typewriter, Source Code and Focus), includes code fence support, light and drak themes, emoji auto-completion, and export to PDF, HTML or styled HTML.
  • Google’s VR180 Creator Makes It Easier to Edit VR Video on Linux
    It’s called “VR180 Creator” (catchy) and the tool aims to make it easier for people to edit video shot on 180-degree and 360-degree devices like the Lenovo Mirage camera (pictured opposite). And boy is just-such a tool needed! VR180 Creator: Easier VR Video Editing Editing VR video is, to be perfectly frank, a pain in the rump end. So by releasing this new, open-source tool for free Google is being rather smart.Anything that makes it easier for consumers and content creators to edit VR on something other than a high-end specialist rig is going to help the format flourish.

Devuan GNU+Linux 2.0.0 "ASCII"

When I am trying out a desktop distribution, what really tends to divide the field of Linux distributions in my mind is not whether the system uses MATE or Plasma, or whether the underlying package manager uses RPM or Deb files. What tends to leave a lasting impression with me is whether the desktop environment, its applications and controls feel like a cooperative, cohesive experience or like a jumble of individual tools that happen to be part of the same operating system. In my opinion Ubuntu running the Unity desktop and Linux Mint's Cinnamon desktop are good examples of the cohesive approach. The way openSUSE's administration tools work together provides another example. Like them or hate them, I think most people can see there is an overall design, a unifying vision, being explored with those distributions. I believe Devuan falls into the other category, presenting the user with a collection of utilities and features where some assembly is still required. This comes across in little ways. For example, many distributions ship Mozilla's Firefox web browser and the Thunderbird e-mail client together as a set, and they generally complement each other. Devuan ships Firefox, but then its counterpart is the mutt console e-mail program which feels entirely out of place with the rest of the desktop software. The PulseAudio sound mixing utility is included, but its system tray companion is not present by default. Even the system installer, which switches back and forth between graphical windows and a text console, feels more like a collection of uncoordinated prompts rather than a unified program or script. Some people may like the mix-and-match approach, but I tend to prefer distributions where it feels like the parts are fitted together to create a unified experience. What I found was that Devuan provided an experience where I had to stop and think about where items were or how I was going to use them rather than having the pieces seamlessly fit together. However, once I got the system set up in a way that was more to my liking, I appreciated the experience provided. Devuan offers a stable, flexible platform. Once I shaped the operating system a little, I found it to be fast, light and capable. Having a fairly large repository of software available along with Flatpak support provided a solid collection of applications on a conservative operating system foundation. It was a combination I liked. In short, I think Devuan has some rough edges and setting it up was an unusually long and complex experience by Linux standards. I certainly wouldn't recommend Devuan to newcomers. However, a day or two into the experience, Devuan's stability and performance made it a worthwhile journey. I think Devuan may be a good alternative to people who like running Debian or other conservative distributions such as Slackware. I suspect I may soon be running Devuan's Raspberry Pi build on my home server where its lightweight nature will be welcome. Read more Also: deepin 15.6 Released With New Features: Get This Beautiful Linux Distro Here

Android Leftovers