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original content

This began as a list of original articles found on tuxmachines.org, either by me or someone else, but it has since morphed into a list of original articles found on tuxmachines.org and the articles I've had published elsewhere.

  1. Linux Tycoon: Design and Manage Your Own Distribution - March 31, 2012
  2. Ubuntu 12.04 Beta 2 Arrives for Testing - March 29, 2012
  3. GNOME 3.4 Released with Lots of Improvement - March 28, 2012
  4. Greg K-H Updates Tumbleweed Status - March 27, 2012
  5. LibreOffice 3.4.6 Released - March 22, 2012
  6. openSUSE 12.2 M2, Better Late than Never - March 21, 2012
  7. Mitchell Baker Says H.264 is About User Experience - March 19, 2012
  8. LibreOffice 3.5.1 Released with Fixes - March 18, 2012
  9. Mageia 2 Beta 2, Still No Live Images - March 16, 2012
  10. KDE Spark Tablet Renamed to Honor Classical Composer - March 15, 2012
  11. Final Debian 5 Update Released - March 13, 2012
  12. Arch Turns Ten - Mar 12, 2012
  13. Raspberry Pi Orders Now Being Accepted - Feb 29, 2012
  14. Upcoming GNOME 3.4 Previewed - Feb 28, 2012
  15. Fedora's Beefy Miracle Sizzling with Alpha 1 - Feb 28, 2012
  16. Amnesia, Scariest Game Ever, to Get Sequel - Feb 24, 2012
  17. Intel Joins TDF, Adds LibreOffice to AppUp Center - Feb 23, 2012
  18. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.7 to 5.8 Risk Report - Feb 21, 2012
  19. The Document Foundation Incorporated in Germany - Feb 20, 2012
  20. KDE Spark Tablet Pre-Order Registration Open - Feb 16, 2012
  21. LibreOffice 3.5 Released - Feb 14, 2012
  22. Debian GNU/Linux 5.0 Reaches End of Life - Feb 10, 2012
  23. Pardus Future Uncertain, Fork Probable - Feb 07, 2012
  24. PCLinuxOS 2012.2 Released - Feb 02, 2012
  25. openSUSE has a Dream - Jan 31, 2012
  26. Mandriva Bankruptcy Crisis Averted, For Now - Jan 30, 2012
  27. GhostBSD 2.5 - Now with an Easy Graphic Installer - Jan 26, 2012
  28. Gentoo-based Toorox Releases 01.2012 GNOME Edition - Jan 25, 2012
  29. Mandriva Decision Delayed Again - Jan 23, 2012
  30. Xfce's Early April Fool's Joke - Jan 20, 2012
  31. KDE 4.9 to get a New Widgets Explorer - Jan 19, 2012
  32. Meet Bodhi's Bulky Brother: Bloathi - Jan 18, 2012
  33. Mandriva Delays Bankruptcy Decision - Jan 17, 2012
  34. LibreOffice 3.4.5 Released - Jan 16, 2012
  35. Fedora Running Beefy Contest - Jan 13, 2012
  36. Mageia 2 Inches Along with Another Alpha - Jan 12, 2012
  37. Linux Mint 12 KDE Almost Ready - Jan 11, 2012
  38. Greg KH Posts Status of Kernel Tree - Jan 10, 2012
  39. Unused LibreOffice Code Expunged - Jan 9, 2012
  40. Is Mandriva Finished This Time? - Jan 5, 2012
  41. New aptosid Fork, siduction 11.1 Released - Jan 4, 2012
  42. Lefebvre Introduces GNOME 3 Fork - Jan 3, 2012
  43. Gentoo Gets New Year's Release - Jan 2, 2012










More in Tux Machines

SUSE/OpenSUSE: Ceph and OpenSUSE's Tumbleweed Progress

  • Can I deploy Ceph on older hardware?

    You just retired a bunch of servers and disk arrays, but before you place hundreds of thousands or millions of dollars’ worth of equipment on the curb, you’re wondering if you can use it for a Ceph-based storage solution like SUSE Enterprise Storage. The answer is: maybe. SUSE prides itself on supporting a wide range of hardware, from blades to retail terminals to IoT devices. In fact, SUSE makes it possible to easily deploy a wide range of software on that hardware and certify it will work through the SUSE YES Certification Program. SUSE Yes Certification assures your IHV equipment is fully compatible with SUSE software, including SUSE Enterprise Storage.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2019/42

    Another week has passed with again four snapshots published. This pace seems to be holding pretty solid and I think it’s not the worst speed there is. During this week, we have released the snapshots 1011, 1012, 1014 and 1016. As usual, some were smaller, some were bigger.

EPA and EPAAR

  • EPA Rule Will Make Its Custom Code Open Source By Default

    The Environmental Protection Agency is getting ready to default to making all its custom code open source, finally meeting an Office of Management and Budget policy instituted during the last administration.

    The EPA will publish a notice Friday in the Federal Register soliciting public comment on a new open-source policy that will be added to the agency’s acquisition regulations. The clause—which will be added to all EPA contracts that include the use of open-source software or the development of custom code that may or may not be shared widely—will require contractors to provide the agency with all “underlying source code, license file, related files, build instructions, software user’s guides, automated test suites and other associated documentation as applicable,” according to the notice.

  • Environmental Protection Agency Acquisition Regulation (EPAAR); Open Source Software

    A Proposed Rule by the Environmental Protection Agency on 10/18/2019

    [...]

    The EPA is writing a new EPAAR clause to address open source software requirements at EPA, so that the EPA can share custom-developed code as open source code developed under its procurements, in accordance with Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) Memorandum M-16-21, Federal Source Code Policy: Achieving Efficiency, Transparency, and Innovation through Reusable and Open Source Software. In meeting the requirements of Memorandum M-16-21 the EPA will be providing an enterprise code inventory indicating if the new code (source code or code) was custom-developed for, or by, the agency; or if the code is available for Federal reuse; or if the code is available publicly as open source code; or if the code cannot be made available due to specific exceptions.

Samsung discontinues ‘Linux on DeX’ program

  • Samsung discontinues ‘Linux on DeX’ program, removing support w/ Android 10

    Late last year, Samsung and Canonical partnered on an app that allowed select Galaxy phones to run a full Linux desktop on top of Android. Less than a year later, Samsung has announced that they’re discontinuing the Linux on DeX program, coinciding with the update to Android 10. One of the sci-fi-style dreams that many of us have had since the onset of smartphones is the idea of plugging your phone into a desktop-size monitor to get a desktop-style experience. Through the years, many have attempted it in earnest, and the latest offering from Samsung brought an interesting approach.

  • Samsung Calls It Quits on the ‘Linux on DeX’ Project

    Samsung DeX, if you have heard of it, allows the users to turn their Galaxy phones into desktop PCs simply by connecting a monitor and other peripherals. The company made DeX more welcoming and useful for Galaxy flagship users by partnering with Canonical earlier last year. It made it possible for users to run a full Linux desktop instance on its DeX-supported flagship phones. This was an amazing feature for developers and users who didn’t really like carrying a laptop with them. They could rely on their Galaxy flagship (including the Galaxy S and Note-series) for a desktop-like experience, running Ubuntu on the move. However, the response to Linux on DeX seems to have been lackluster and Samsung has decided to shutter this project.

  • Samsung is discontinuing Linux support on Dex

    Samsung goes on to explain that starting with its Android 10 beta ROMS, already rolling out on certain devices, Linux support will be removed from Dex altogether. This does make us wonder if, perhaps, the third-party OS emulation setup Samsung was employing to get Linux to work in the first place somehow breaks certain rules or security policies Google implemented with the latest Android version. Regardless of whether or not this is the case, if you are currently using Linux on Dex, you definitely want to start keeping regular backups of your data. Since, given current developments even staying on Android 9 and not updating your phone's Android OS still might not be a sure-fire way to keep the feature running.

Android Leftovers