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Free Ways to approach Ubuntu from Windows

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Ubuntu

For Windows Users: Apart the rhetoric that Linux is not Windows, how can one gradually get used to this different way of conceiving an operating system? Ubuntu has many killer applications Windows users can benefit from. If you’re stuck in your Windows sphere and do not intend moving out – no problem, it is understandable, but you can still improve your productivity by running Ubuntu and many of its indispensable applications on your Windows OS. This is how:

The fast way: The LiveCd of Ubuntu and other Linux distribution is the easiest way to get started. Live CDs are normal CDs containing a bootable operating system. To make one all you need is a CD/DVD burner, and an ISO file, downloadable from the Ubuntu website. With live CDs you can quickly carry-out a hardware compatibility tests, LAN, Audio,Video etc.

The old way:

rest here




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