Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

The "I'm Linux" Video Contest

Filed under
Linux

If you've been alive and aware of mass media over the last twelve months, you've probably seen television commercials from Apple and Microsoft touting their operating system. From Apple's ubiquitous "I'm a Mac" to Jerry Seinfeld to Microsoft's "I'm a PC" retort, operating system commercials have been flooding the airways. Except one OS has been notably absent – Linux.

While the Linux Foundation would love to spend millions promoting Linux on TV, it's simply not our style (or in our budget). Even more importantly, Linux isn't a top-down, commercially controlled operating system. It's a grassroots product of mass collaboration. That's why we're sponsoring a community contest to create a Linux video that showcases just what Linux means to those who use it, and hopefully inspires many to try it.
The winner will receive a free trip to Tokyo, Japan to participate in the Linux Foundation Japan Linux Symposium in October 2009. The winning video will also be unveiled at the Linux Foundation's Collaboration Summit in San Francisco on April 8, 2009.

Contest Rules:

• Open to anyone over 18 (due to legal and travel restrictions)
• Winner receives airfare/hotel and conference registration for Linux Foundation Japan Symposium in October 2009.
• Contest winner to be decided by a panel of judges picked by the Linux Foundation
• Each video needs to be no longer than 60 seconds in length
• Each video cannot violate our terms of service. (Don't violate others' intellectual property rights, don't post anything offensive, etc.)
• The contest opens Jan 26 and will close at midnight pacific on March 15, 2009. Winners will be showcased at the Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit.
• The prize: Airfare (from the airport closest to winner's home to Narita, Japan) and accommodations (double occupancy) will be provided for three nights.
Guidelines:
• In 60 seconds or less, showcase your take on "I'm Linux." This should be why you love it and should inspire others to use it. The video can be an extensive production, a plain testimonial or as simple as a screen capture with a voice over. Be creative, be authentic and have fun.
• While you may be inspired by the Apple or Microsoft commercials, it's not a requirement to parody or make reference to them.
• Humour is always a good way to showcase your passion (and win a contest), but is not required.
• Judging criteria will be: originality, clarity of message and how much it inspires others to use Linux. The judges will also take into account community votes on the Linux Foundation video site such as number of favourites and starred voting, but that is not the sole criteria for winning.
• Enter as many unique entries as you'd like. Please do not submit duplicate entries. Any entry that violates copyright protections or the Linux Foundation Terms of Use will be disqualified and removed.
• Companies or communities can have their own entry but only one individual can win. (This means there can be multiple Ubuntu or OpenSuse entries but the person submitting the winning video gets to go to Japan. You can say who you're representing in the video if it's important to you.)
• Please vote for and comment on your favourites. This is a community contest.
• Enter the contest and vote on this site!

We're formally launching this contest in late January, but you can get started on your entries today. Please upload them here. Email amanda (at) linuxfoundation if you have questions.

More in Tux Machines

Why Everyone should know vim

Vim is an improved version of Vi, a known text editor available by default in UNIX distributions. Another alternative for modal editors is Emacs but they’re so different that I kind of feel they serve different purposes. Both are great, regardless. I don’t feel vim is necessarily a geeky kind of taste or not. Vim introduced modal editing to me and that has changed my life, really. If you have ever tried vim, you may have noticed you have to press “I” or “A” (lower case) to start writing (note: I’m aware there are more ways to start editing but the purpose is not to cover Vim’s functionalities.). The fun part starts once you realize you can associate Insert and Append commands to something. And then editing text is like thinking of what you want the computer to show on the computer instead of struggling where you at before writing. The same goes for other commands which are easily converted to mnemonics and this is what helped getting comfortable with Vim. Note that Emacs does not have this kind of keybindings but they do have a Vim-like mode - Evil (Extensive Vi Layer). More often than not, I just need to think of what I want to accomplish and type the first letters. Like Replace, Visual, Delete, and so on. It is a modal editor after all, meaning it has modes for everything. This is also what increases my productivity when writing files. I just think of my intentions and Vim does the things for me. Read more

Graphics: Intel and Mesa 18.1 RC1 Released

  • Intel 2018Q1 Graphics Stack Recipe
    Last week Intel's Open-Source Technology Center released their latest quarterly "graphics stack recipe" for the Linux desktop. The Intel Graphics Stack Recipe is the company's recommended configuration for an optimal and supported open-source graphics driver experience for their Intel HD/UHD/Iris Graphics found on Intel processors.
  • Mesa 18.1-RC1 Released With The Latest Open-Source 3D Driver Features
    Seemingly flying under our radar is that Mesa 18.1 has already been branched and the first release candidate issued. While the Mesa website hasn't yet been updated for the 18.1 details, Dylan Baker appears to be the release manager for the 18.1 series -- the second quarter of 2018 release stream.

Exploring Contributors Centrality Over Time

At the end of my previous post we concluded with yet another question. Indeed, on the 2017 KDEPIM contributor network we found out that Christian Mollekopf while being a very consistent committer didn't appear as centrality as we would expect. Yet from the topology he seemed to act as a bridge between the core contributors and contributors with a very low centrality. This time we'll try to look into this and figure out what might be going on. My first attempt at this was to try to look into the contributor network on a different time period and see how it goes. If we take two snapshots of the network for the two semesters of 2017, how would it look? Well, easy to do with my current scripts so let's see! Read more

KDE: Elisa 0.1.1, KDE Plasma 5.13 and More

  • 0.1.1 Release of Elisa
    The Elisa team is happy to announce the first bug fix release for the 0.1 version.
  • KDE Plasma 5.13 Is Making Great Improvements On Its Wayland Support
    KDE Plasma 5.13 that is due for release in June will have a great number of improvements to its Wayland support for allowing the KDE Plasma desktop to work much better on this alternative to the X.Org Server. KDE developer Roman Gilg has provided a nice summary of some of the Wayland improvements in the queue for the Plasma 5.13.0 release due out towards the middle of June.
  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 15
    I’ve initiated a big project: overhauling KDE Open & Save dialogs for greater usability and productivity.
  • Latte bug fix release v0.7.5
    Latte Dock v0.7.5   has been released containing important fixes and improvements! Hopefullly this is going to be the last stable version for v0.7.x family. During the next months the next stable branch (v0.8.x) is going to appear.