Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

The Knoppix Advantage

Filed under
Reviews

There is a great deal of discussion going on about which distribution is most ideal for the desktop, with people taking different sides. If you ask me, Knoppix scores over other distros when it comes to installing Linux on old machines. Let me elaborate on how I reached this conclusion.

Recently, I received a Knoppix Ver 4.0 live CD from a friend. And I decided to try it out on one of my older computers. The computer has a Celeron 333 MHz processor, with 96 MB SDRAM, Microsoft Serial IntelliMouse, Aztec 2320 chipset based ISA sound card and 440LX Intel Original motherboard - In short, a really old machine in today's standards. In the past, I have had lots of trouble in installing Linux (which includes Fedora and Ubuntu) on this machine especially problems with sound and mouse, each time having to tweak the configuration files to get both working . But when I popped in the Knoppix live CD, I was amazed to see it detecting both my sound card and mouse correctly. In fact, I saw it booting into KDE (the default window manager) without prompting for any user input.

Full Article.

More in Tux Machines

What’s new in Fedora 22 Workstation

The Fedora Workstation edition is a reliable, user-friendly, and powerful operating system for your laptop or desktop computer. It supports a wide range of developers, from hobbyists and students to professionals in corporate environments. Fedora 22 Workstation builds on the previous initial release of Fedora 21 Workstation, providing a set of enhancements designed to boost your workflow and help your productivity. Read more

Watch: Mark Shuttleworth's Keynote at the OpenStack Summit 2015

As expected, Canonical was present at the OpenStack Summit 2015 event that took place in Vancouver, British Columbia between May 18-22. Read more

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Going Free/Open Source

  • Twitter Kit and Digits for Android go open source
    With a swarm of developers from around the world converging on San Francisco’s Moscone Center tomorrow for Google I/O, Twitter wants them to keep the company’s real-time social platform at the top of mind. This afternoon it announced that its developer tools for integrating Twitter into Android apps have been open-sourced, with the projects now hosted publicly on Github.
  • First Look Publishes Open Source Code To Advance Privacy, Security, and Journalism
    The Intercept and its publisher First Look Media strongly believe in the benefits of free and open source software — in part because we rely on such software every day. To keep our journalists and sources safe, we use secure communication tools like the data-encryption system GnuPG, the Off-the-Record secure messaging protocol, the SecureDrop communications platform, and the secure calling and texting app Signal. To publish on the web, we use the GNU/Linux operating system; the Apache web server; OpenSSL, a web encryption library; WordPress, the open-source blogging engine; and Piwik, which tracks web traffic. The list goes on.
  • Google Makes The Roboto Typeface Open Source
    With Ice Cream Sandwich, Google introduced Roboto to the world. Since then, the family (designed by Googler Christian Robertson) has expanded to include a set of slab serif fonts, and has even seen a major revision introduced with Android 5.0 last year.