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Blackberry tethering (and more) on Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
MDV
SUSE
Ubuntu

This article explains how to tether a Blackberry phone - use it as a modem, via a USB cable - in Linux, covering Mandriva, Ubuntu, OpenSUSE and Fedora. It also mentions some other things that the Barry project lets you do with your Blackberry.

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