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Google Gmail accounts are bottomless barrels

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PLENTY OF US use Google's Gmail accounts on a daily basis. I, for instance, obtained my first account back in early June, 2004. It only took me 10 months to fill Google's until then considered "huge" storage space. See, one gigabyte is not so much after all when you start leaving all your email on the remote server.

Back in February, I started getting nervous when the space-metre at my Gmail account hit "95%". I asked my contact at Google in the UK what would happen when the account reached 100%. Would email start bouncing back to sender? Would I be alerted and given the option to "upgrade" for a fee to a bigger storage space?

Well, nothing like that ever happened, because Google's person never got back to me with her responses, and as you can see below, email keeps pouring in, and my Gmail account is already showing "102%" of space used.


Until Google figures what to do with those of us with full Gmail accounts, and if you don't want to risk losing your email due to bounces, you can use a trick. Open a secondary Gmail account, and then configure Google's forwarding option to forward every inbound message to your secondary one, selecting the option "trash it from the inbox" so you don't end up with duplicates.

There's a side effect to this, however. You end up with two "isolated islands" of email bases, and you have to log in and log out in order to search in each. Clearly, Google better decide what to do with those of us in this position, as my blood pressure has already started going up. µ

Story By Fernando Cassia from theinquirer.

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