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Red Hat looks under Linux's hood

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Linux

Trying to take a more active role in open-source programming, Red Hat has created a team of 34 programmers to work on nothing but next-generation software, the company plans to announce Tuesday.

The move is enabled by the Linux seller's surging profit and ensures the programmers will have time for the development instead of worrying about customer support requirements, said Brian Stevens, Red Hat's new chief technology officer. The company plans to double the team's size in the next nine months.

The team has several priorities, Stevens said: incorporating the Xen software to let a computer run several independent operating systems at the same time; improving the "stateless Linux" software to try to make desktop Linux a cost-effective option; and maturing programming tools such as the SystemTap probing software.

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