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A Peak at MDK 10.2-b2 AMD64

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Reviews
Submitted by Anonymous

Anonymous writes, "It took about 10-12 minutes to install. I selected the default installation. You need all 3 cd's if you are doing the default install though it appears to only need 3-4 packages from the 3rd cd.

Boot up speed was about the same as the x86 version. The noticable difference came after logging into the desktop. This is where you begin to notice the speed difference from accessing the menus to launching applications.

I tested launching various applications. All kde apps were fast to launch as well as Mozilla Firefox. OpenOffice though seem to launch and run about the same as the x86 version.

The Mandrake Control Center works well and I like the descriptive menu entries.


I wasn't too crazy about the KDE menu structure. It seems to contain a mismash of subdirectories and applications. I prefer a more structured menu with subdirectories but that is a personal observation. Others may find it easier to find applications without having to dig down too far in the menu.


CDR and DVD burning is supported out of the box. You will need to install additional programs to view dvds, flash, java and quicktime movie trailers.

Also the online updater doesnt seem to do anything when clicked on (orange question button on the taskbar).

I test ran most of the applications. Overall they seem to be pretty stable though Kscd and Kaffeine crashed at start up the first time and Mozilla-Firefox refused to use the KDE crystal icon set. One thing that was sorely missing from the menu was an email client. Hopefully these small issues will be ironed out in the final release."

Click HERE for more screenshots.

Click here for a full list of the default packages installed.

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