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Intel Has Been Busy Busy Busy

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Hardware

Intel isn't letting any moss grow on it announcing another new chip in the oven. Besides the dual-core announced yesterday, a 64-bit Pentium 4 due out by months end. Here's a story reporting an increase in speed for the Xeon line. In addition, TechWorld is giving us a little sneak peak into some of Intel's plans for the future.

But hold the phone. Ed Taylor is reporting that IBM's Cell "surpasses Intel's chips in speed, performance and number of transistors" and is planning a desktop featuring said chip by years end. Will this put a bite in the Intel market lead?

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Review: Acer Swift 3 with Ryzen 7 4700U is a $650 laptop that punches above its class

    While I did not take the time to install a GNU/Linux distro to local storage and test battery life and long-term performance, I did take an Ubuntu 20.04 LTS LiveUSB for a spin and found that almost everything seemed to be working out of the box.

  • The Preservation and Continuation of the Iconic Linux Journal

    As we welcome the return of Linux Journal, it’s worth recognizing the impact of the September 22nd announcement of the magazine’s return and how it sparked many feelings of nostalgia and excitement in thousands among the Linux community. That being said, it is also worth noting that the ways in which journalism has changed since Linux Journal’s first publication in 1994. The number of printed magazines have significantly decreased and exclusively digitally published content has become the norm in most cases. Linux Journal experienced this change in 2011 when the print version of the magazine was discontinued. Although many resented the change, it is far from the only magazine that embraced this trend. Despite the bitterness by some, embracing the digital version of Linux Journal allowed for its writers and publishers to direct their focus on taking full advantage of what the internet had to offer. Despite several advantages of an online publishing format, one concern that was becoming increasingly concerning for Linux Journal until September 22nd, 2020 was the survival of the Linux Journal website. If the website were to have shut down, the community would have potentially lost access to hundreds (or thousands) of articles and documents that were only published on the Linux Journal website and were not collectively available anywhere else. Even if an individual possessed the archive of the monthly issues of the journal, an attempt to republish it would be potentially legally problematic and would certainly show a lack of consideration for the rights of the authors who originally wrote the articles.

  • What is cooking on KDE websites this month (September)?

    The wiki instance we use, there migrated to MediaWiki 3.34 the latest LTS version, this bring a few improvement in the translations module and fix the problem that translated pages couldn’t be moved arround. The commenting plugin was sadly discountinued in this version and instead the Echo extension was added and provide a way to ping people.

  • SoK 2021: Mentor Wanted!

    The Season of KDE is a 3 weeks long program that provides an opportunity for people to do mentored projects for KDE. We are still looking for more mentors for SoK 2021. So please consider mentoring for this year season and adding ideas related to the project you are working on in the Wiki page. And joining the #kde-soc channel.

Kernel: Greg Kroah-Hartman and Zink

  • Computers Are Hard: hardware with Greg Kroah-Hartman

    I asked Greg Kroah-Hartman to tell me about the work that goes into making computer peripherals do — mostly — what we ask them to. Greg is the maintainer of the Linux kernel’s stable releases and an author of books about writing Linux drivers. He took me on a journey from a tiny processor embedded in a mouse to deep inside the guts of an operating system.

    Oh, and he explained printers to me, too.

  • Perhaps You Thought I Was Finished

    This test loops 5000 times, using a different sampler texture for each draw, and then destroys the texture. This is supposed to catch drivers which can’t properly manage their resource refcounts, but instead here zink is getting caught by trying to dump 5000 active resources into the same command buffer, which ooms the system. The reason for the problem in this case is that, after my recent optimizations which avoid unnecessary flushing, zink only submits the command buffer when a frame is finished or one of the write-flagged resources associated with an active batch is read from. Thus, the whole test runs in one go, only submitting the queue at the very end when the test performs a read.

  • Automate

    Today I’m taking a break from writing about my work to write about the work of zink’s newest contributor, He Haocheng (aka @hch12907). Among other things, Haocheng has recently tackled the issue of extension refactoring, which is a huge help for future driver development. I’ve written time and time again about adding extensions, and with this patchset in place, the process is simplified and expedited almost into nonexistence.

Linux in Devices/Embedded

     
  • 3-TOPS per Watt Hailo-8 NPU arrives on M.2 module

    Hailo has launched a line of M.2 and mini-PCIe cards for Linux systems equipped with its up to 26-TOPS, 3-TOPS per Watt Hailo-8 NPU. The Hailo-8 is featured in Foxconn’s BOXiedge v2 AI edge server. In May we reported on Foxconn’s BOXiedge v2, which runs Linux on Socionext’s 24x Cortex-A53 SynQuacer SC2A11 SoC and a 3-TOPS per Watt Hailo-8 NPU that can run at up to 26 TOPS. Now Hailo has launched an M.2 implementation of the Hailo-8, with a mini-PCIe version on the way. The M.2 M-key 2242 form-factor accelerator is the world’s highest performance AI M.2 module, claims Hailo.

  • Arm Announces Cortex-A78AE CPU, Mali-G78AE GPU & Mali-C71AE ISP for autonomous automotive & industrial applications

    Arm has announced new CPU, GPU, and ISP specifically designed for autonomous automotive and industrial applications with respectively Cortex-A78AE CPU, Arm Mali-G78AE GPU, and Arm Mali-C71AE ISP. 

  • New STM32H7 Cortex-M7 MCUs Clock at 550 MHz, Feature Octal SPI Flash and Ethernet Interfaces

    STMicro launched STM32H7 single-core Cortex-M7 microcontroller family a while ago, followed by some dual-core Cortex-M7/M4 models, with most clocked up to 480 MHz. The company has now announced five faster parts clocked at up to 550 MHz with STM32H723, STM32H733, STM32H725, STM32H735, and STM32H730 which STMicro claims is “the fastest core speed in the market among MCUs that integrate Flash storage on-chip to run deeply embedded applications”. The embedded flash storage is important, as you may now NXP i.MX RT1170 Cortex-M7/M4 crossover processor can reach up to 1 GHz but does not include flash storage.

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  • Mecool KM6 Amlogic S905X4 Android TV box plays 4K AV1 videos, supports WiFi 6

    We’ve heard about Amlogic S905X4 processor for 4K TV boxes with AV1 support for about year, and while we’ve written about upcoming S905X4 TV boxes such as SDMC DV8919, none of them have launched so far, as silicon design and/or software development have taken a bit longer than expected, and we’re now far from the Q4 2019 launch date shown on the roadmap.

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  • Raspberry Pi reaches more schools in rural Togo
             

Free Software and FOSS

  • Michael Meeks: 2020-10-01 Thursday

    In talking to a number of friends, one mentioned that the idea of 'gratis everything' is an increasing problem in many FOSS projects. It's interesting, many years back the fashion was to talk about Open Standards (which are of course great) instead of Open Source (which is better). Noawadays that's less popular and I hear people emphasising the vital Freedom from Price (or even reminders to contribute) in place of Software Freedom. Possibly both of these betray an emphasis on users's rights rather than the responsibility to contribute.

  • LibrePlanet 2021 CFS office hours

    The LibrePlanet call for sessions is open now and will be open until November 20 and we want to hear from you! Speaking at a conference, and even submitting a proposal, can be intimidating or hard. Luckily, some great, experienced speakers are volunteering their time to help out during the CFS office hours. Whether you want to propose a talk and want feedback on your idea, proposal wording, talk title, or just advice on how to deal with nerves, there is one more office hour slot scheduled over the next few weeks.

  • Christopher Allan Webber: Spritely website launches, plus APConf video(s)!

    Not bad, eh? Also with plenty of cute characters on the Spritely site (thank you to David Revoy for taking my loose character sketches and making them into such beautiful paintings!) But those cute characters are there for a reason! Spritely is quite ambitious and has quite a few subprojects. Here's a video that explains how they all fit together. Hopefully that makes things more clear! Actually that video is from ActivityPub Conference 2020, the talks of which have now all have their videos live! I also moderated the intro keynote panel about ActivityPub authors/editors. Plus there's an easter egg, the ActivityPub Conference Opening Song! :)

  • Should you be concerned about the Windows XP leak?

    When a game was out of date, and he had developed a whole new gaming engine, he would remove licensed third-party code and toss the source out for all to play with under a GPL license, and see what they came up with. All kinds of mods would be made, but more important, it gave coders a chance to show off their chops.

  • Free Tools for FOSS Governance

    Governance plays a crucial role in our world by determining and defining acceptable ways of interacting and doing business with one other. When governance is done well, it provides a supportive framework that facilitates interaction and fades into the background. When it’s done poorly, things don’t run as smoothly. The same is true within open source projects, where governance is key to providing overall operating guidelines, defining rules of conduct, and stating specific goals.

  • Sintel 10th Anniversary

    Early this morning I read a post from Colin Levy on Twitter informing the open movie Sintel had its 10th anniversary today. Ten years... This project really influenced so many components of my life (especially about the software and licenses I use now). I also met a lot of great people on it and my artworks started to get a lot of visibility at that time. So, I took my stylus, opened Krita 4.4beta2 and started a quick painting to meditate about it. I hope you'll like it! Thank you again Sintel team and happy anniversary!

  • How open source underpins blockchain technology

    One of the more popular operating systems, Linux, is open source. Linux powers the servers for many of the services we feel comfortable sharing personal information on every day.