Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

First-ever Open Source Compliance Insurance

Filed under
OSS

Kiln plc of London, U.K., a Lloyd's of London underwriter and Miller Insurance Services Limited (Miller) a Lloyd's broker, announced today that they will offer a new product called Open Source Compliance Insurance. Open Source Compliance Insurance is the world's first insurance policy to cover the specialized risks faced by enterprises that include or rely upon elements of Linux and other open source software in their commercial products or internal IT infrastructure.

Open Source Compliance Insurance will initially offer cover of up to $10 million for direct loss suffered by the insured following a finding of non-compliance with specific license agreements under which open source code is obtainable. The insurance will indemnify the insured for the loss of profits associated with the withdrawal or alteration of a product incorporating non-compliant code or the impaired valuation of an acquisition agreement exchanging open source software. In certain circumstances the policy would pay the costs to mitigate such losses including the expense of repair or replacement of code that is found to infringe upon the General Public License (GPL) or other Open Source licenses. This pioneering product was developed as part of a three way collaboration between Miller (the broker), Kiln (underwriter) and Open Source Risk Management (OSRM) of New York, which will act as the exclusive worldwide risk-assessor and advisor under the facility.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

First thoughts on KaOS 2014.12

The latest snapshot of this rolling release distribution includes initial support for UEFI, the KDE 4.14 desktop, systemd version 218 and the Qupzilla web browser. I mention Qupzilla because I feel it is a rare gem in the open source world, a quick capable browser that perhaps does not get the attention it deserves. KaOS is available in just one edition, a 64-bit x86 build. The ISO we download for KaOS is 1.6GB in size. Read more

6 big changes coming to Fedora 22

Hold on to your (red) hats. Fedora 22, the next iteration of the "move fast and break things" version of Linux sponsored by Red Hat, is set to arrive on May 19. After the multiple editions introduced in the previous Fedora, what's in store this time? The answer lies with the proposals received by the Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee (FESCo), whose deadline for proposed changes passed last week. Here are some of the more notable and head-turning proposals for Fedora 22 that seem most likely to make it to the final product. Read more

Sorry, Windows 10 Fans, but This Is What Icons Should Look Like

The icon theme of an operating system has more importance than people might imagine. Microsoft has updated the icons for the latest Windows 10 preview and they actually look terrible and they lack consistency. We listed a few Linux ones for a better comparison. Read more

Canonical Reveals the Hardware Specs of the Ubuntu Aquarius E4.5 Phone

In the meantime, even if Meizu was the first company to confirm the release of an Ubuntu phone, it looks like Bq beat them to the punch, although they are aiming at different users. The specs detailed by Canonical show that Aquarius E4.5 is an affordable device with medium hardware specs. It doesn't seem like much, but it's addressed at people who don't want to spend too much on a high-end phone, but still want to own a smartphone. Read more