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QUAKE 4 Tournament at DreamHack 2005 with $6000 Prize

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Gaming

VIA together with S3 Graphics are sponsoring the DreamHack 2005 event, taking place 24-27 November in Sweden, and the hosting of the first ever large-scale QUAKE 4 LAN tournament.

QUAKE 4 looks set to be one of the most important professional tournament games in 2006, and has been included in the official 2006 worldwide tournament schedule of the Cyber Professional League (CPL), one of the leading e-sports competition organizers. The VIA Quake 4 Tournament will give pro gamers the opportunity to play against a large field of competitors for cash prizes, as well testing their skills against members of the renowned all-girls gaming team, girlz 0f destruction at the VIA and S3 Graphics booth.

Players can register online for the VIA DreamHack QUAKE 4 Tournament through VIA Competitive Gamers Arena, VIA's dedicated website for the professional gaming community.

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