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Slackware Approaches Stable 12.2 Release

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Slack

Linux Weekly News directs readers to a Slackware Linux list post detailing the package versions and included components for the upcoming Slackware 12.2 release. The major components (such as X, and the kernel) are now frozen, and most of the remaining changes are smaller adjustments and documentation updates.

Since this release is incremental, the Slackware developers focused on maintaining backward compatibility without sacrificing stability. This is why the team decided to forego the new X server and merging KDE4, and wait to implement these updates in the 13.0 release.

more here




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  • M$ Kicks Second Most Loyal Users In The Teeth [Ed: context below]
  • Windows 10 updates are now ruining pro-gaming streams
    Forcing a gaming PC to update mid-game during a livestream to up to 130,000 followers isn’t best advert for the software
  • Containers Used on over Half of New Apps in Production
    Shippable, the Seattle-based producer of a continuous delivery platform for software developers, recently quizzed 300 coders in the U.S. and found that more than half of them (52 percent) are using Docker or other container technologies to deploy their new applications in production. Fourteen percent are using containers for development and testing purposes. Indicating that 2016 is the year that containers cement their hold on the enterprise, a whopping 89 percent of respondents told the startup that they were very or somewhat likely to increase their use of the DevOps-enabling technology within the next 12 months. Developers are turning to containers when speed is of the essence. Containers have helped a majority of developers (74 percent) ship new software at least 10 percent faster. Eight percent are enjoying a 50-percent boost.
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  • gNewSense 4.0 released
    I hereby announce the release of gNewSense 4, codenamed Ucclia. It's based on a solid Debian, modified to respect the Free Software Foundation's and is available for 3 architectures: i386, amd64 and mipsel (Lemote Yeeloong).
  • IPFire 2.19 Core Update 102 Linux Firewall OS Lands More OpenSSL Security Fixes
    Yesterday we reported news on the release of the IPFire 2.19 Core Update 102 Linux kernel-based firewall distribution, which brought many security patches and improvements, along with updated components. Today, May 5, 2016, we're informing our readers about the immediate availability of IPFire 2.19 Core Update 102, a small maintenance build to the stable IPFire 2.19 distribution that updates the OpenSSL package to version 1.0.2h, fixing a total of six vulnerabilities discovered upstream.
  • Samsung’s Artik 10, starts shipping in the US for $150
    Samsung’s Artik development boards are finally reaching hands of consumers in the US. The Artik development boards which were unveiled back in May 2015 at the IoT World 2015 have taken quite a lot of time to become consumer ready and take over the likes of the new Raspberry Pi 3, Pine 64,etc which have revolutionized the DIY Maker community with the “PC ona board” concept. And now, the Artik 10- the most powerful board from the Artik series is all set to intensify the ongoing competition. Priced at $150, which is more than what one would pay for 4 $35 priced Raspberry Pis, Samsung will sure have to do a lot to of work to impress the buyers and build a community around it.
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