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Plymouth To Replace USplash In Ubuntu?

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Software

We've talked about Plymouth now a number of times at Phoronix, which is Red Hat's RHGB replacement starting with Fedora 10 and uses newer Linux technologies like kernel mode-setting to drive this graphical boot screen. As we shared in our detailed analysis of Plymouth it also offers a number of plug-ins and APIs for creating some fairly unique visuals. Now it looks like Plymouth may make its way into Ubuntu.

There is now a Launchpad specification to evaluate Plymouth for Ubuntu and potentially use it to replacement the current USplash project.

More Here




I pray nobody takes the above information seriously.

That is some very impressive markov chains above.

The above text makes almost no sense, I don't think that anyone should attempt to make sense from what has been said. He makes some interesting joined statements, but fundamentally is making it up as he goes along.

re: the above

It's long been known that ATANG1 uses TM's website as a coded method to communicate with his mothership.

Most frequent visitors to TM have long ago gotten used to it, and have created both betting and drinking games involving who can come up with the closest real english translation or guess how many question marks will appear in each sentance.

Me, not only do I enjoy them, but I'm doing my third doctoral dissertation based on a statistical frequency analysis of ATANG1's posts (as it deals with random number generation).

So rock on ATANG1, rock on!

Impressive

wmealing wrote:
That is some very impressive markov chains above.

The above text makes almost no sense, I don't think that anyone should attempt to make sense from what has been said. He makes some interesting joined statements, but fundamentally is making it up as he goes along.

He smokes a lot of weed.

Atang land etc.

My friends have standing bets on which will occur first:

1) vonskippy will express genuine humility;
or
2) Atang will stop the stream of consciousness postings by trying to be the James Joyce of the technical world, and he will finally discover the proper use of the question mark in the English language;
or
3) Poodles will finally move out of his mother's house.

re: atang land

Rolling On The Floor Rolling On The Floor Rolling On The Floor

yaw are just nuts!

re: re: atang land

Muahahahahahahahahaha!

(Now that was funny.)

Santa is watching you!

gfranken wrote:
My friends have standing bets on which will occur first:

1) vonskippy will express genuine humility;
or
2) Atang will stop the stream of consciousness postings by trying to be the James Joyce of the technical world, and he will finally discover the proper use of the question mark in the English language;
or
3) Poodles will finally move out of his mother's house.

Umm part of my job is being a jackass here and remember...Santa is watching you!

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