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Worsed than damned lies?

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Linux

A word about statistics: Fedora continues to be completely open and transparent about the ways we gather statistics and the ways we present them. We don’t document these statistics for purposes of competition, but because we believe our community and our sponsors are invested and interested in knowing some of the end results of the work they do in Fedora. We also use these statistics to help us construct and refine additional community-building strategies and initiatives, which are themselves also openly and transparently produced.

In particular, there are statistics available which show the number of unique IP addresses that have checked in for updates for each of our distributions from Fedora Core 6 up through Fedora 9 and current Rawhide (and soon, Fedora 10). Although totaling those numbers is interesting, it is not meant to indicate a measure of users, only a total number of connections to repositories. No one in Fedora claims a specific number of users based on these statistics. We do know that each of our releases tends to be installed on machines located at 3 to 4 million unique IP addresses. Any one IP address, though, could represent:

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