Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Windows Vista 5231 Exposed

Filed under
Reviews

In the past few weeks, we've taken in-depth look at Windows Vista 5231 build in two installations. The first part covered our initial report of the 5231 while part two delved into pragmatic usage of Vista and overall improvements Microsoft has made thus far.

Microsoft is right on schedule with this month's Windows Vista CTP (Community Technology Preview). We had to really pull some strings to get this release slightly ahead of schedule, but we managed it and it's our pleasure to bring you our initial analysis of the new build, titled 5231.

One of the most dominant applications that 5231 has incorporated is Microsoft's Windows Media Player 11. According to our previously published articles, "This is possibly the only application with more anticipation surrounding it than Internet Explorer 7, if not Vista itself. We wonder if Microsoft would bundle Windows Media Player 11 with Vista exclusively or would it be available for download separately for Windows XP as well. It most certainly will end up looking a lot better (graphically) than most music players out there, iTunes included. Although it appears to look pretty straightforward, the interface has changed drastically, which makes it far more attractive than Windows Media Player 10 as well as competing applications."

Part 1: Windows Vista Build 5231: More Changes....

Part 2: Microsoft Vista 5231: The Real Analysis.

First impression

Ugly ugly ugly. Looks like Gates vomitted all over his interface. XP looks like it went downhill from 98 and this takes the king as ugliest OS I've ever seen. DOS on a 286 had better graphics. Graphics are not just about technology but about usability and taste which of course Microsoft has no abilities in any of these areas.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Why Do People Contribute to Open Source Projects?

Open source development is the future of software. It’s great for users like you and me because open source software is usually free (not always) and often safer to use because malicious code is less likely to be implemented. But what compels developers to contribute code for free? After all, writing code requires time, effort, and expertise. And while it’s true that open source developers can make money, it’s certainly easier through proprietary channels. Read more

Simple Photo Manipulation in GNU/Linux with Fotoxx

Image manipulation in GNU/Linux has always been associated with The Gimp. However, most users will find Gimp vastly oversized for their needs. Fotoxx is a neat, simple and yet very advanced photo manipulation software that is definitely worth installing and playing with.

OpthalmicDocs Releases Open Source Files for Portable Retinal Scanning Technology

We hear enough about how so many third world diseases are preventable, but people just lack the resources; preventable diseases can too easily become severely crippling, or even deadly, due to the condition of poverty. We also hear enough good stories about people who are using their medical and technical knowledge to change this fact. Dr. Sheng Chiong Hong is one such person. Traveling in Kenya, Neapl, and Malaysia exposed him directly to eye care issues, and he was determined to do something about preventable conditions that lead to blindness when undiagnosed and untreated. Read more

Android automotive system features three displays

Mitsubishi’s “FlexConnect.IVI” automotive system runs Android on a TI Jacinto 6 SoC, and drives IVI, HUD, and cluster displays simultaneously. The trouble with most in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) systems is that they’re mounted in the center of the dashboard, and therefore not ideally located for the driver. Yet the display also needs to be accessible from the front seat passenger. Mitsubishi Electric’s FlexConnect.IVI system follows the trend of integrating IVI screens with a separate GUI instrument cluster, and also adds a third GUI heads-up display (HUD) display projected against the windshield for greater driver safety. Read more