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Did Microsoft really kill OLPC?

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OLPC

I posted a number of pieces Monday about OLPC and its XO laptop (now for sale on Amazon in a reboot of the Give One Get One program), one of which declared that OLPC was dead. A year ago, that would have been worthy of a pretty serious flame war, especially considering that Jason Perlow’s and my pieces related to OLPC and the Amazon Kindle sat on the ZDNet homepage for most of a day. Now, as fellow blogger, Larry Dignan, notes, “What a difference a year makes.”

More than anything, I saw quite a bit of antipathy towards what used to be the darling of geek-dom (along with a general acknowledgment of just how much OLPC has actually contributed to this market). One reader did note, however,

“OLPC is dead because Microsoft killed it”

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INTEL and Microsoft

INTEL did most of the heavy lifting.

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