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Red Hat CEO decries open source pretenders

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OSS

Matthew Szulik, Red Hat chief executive, chairman and president, said Wednesday it was wrong to think companies like Red Hat could control what the open source community builds and that it's important to stay true to the premise of the Gnu General Public License (GPL).

Companies that don't remain true to the GPL or who don't endorse patent-free software violate the concept of open source and are hurting innovation, Szulik said.

Companies who violate open source, such as those who claim to provide open source but who add "proprietary" layers to the technology, lack legitimacy. He also raised a red flag over the threat posed to innovation by companies that file hundreds of software patents.

Full Story.

we need non-free technologies

Sound like jabbs at Suse and IBM. Linux will not take the consumer desktop market until they bundle non-free technologies like MP3, video DVD, and the like. Charge us for it for a reasonable price - we will pay.

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